Claims – Halizzle

“He is one of 103,200 or 228,875, or 336,000 Americans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and came back with PTSD,”

  • This is a factual claim. The author has stated a circumstance that exists beyond doubt. This statistic is factual and can not be disputed.

“Even when everyone’s in the family room watching TV, it’s only connected to Netflix and not to cable, since news is often a trigger.”

  • This is an evaluative claim. The author is blaming the news for triggering PTSD symptoms, this raises questions of how and if the news should be monitored.

“Their German shepherd, a service dog trained to help veterans with PTSD”

  • This is a definition claim. The author introduces a concept, a service dog, and tells us what it is “a dog trained to help veterans”

“Some hypotheses for why PTSD only tortures some trauma victims blame it on unhappily coded proteins or a misbehaving amygdala. Family history, or maybe previous trauma.”

  • This is a categorical claim. These are all examples of how somebody could develop PTSD.

“In soldiers, the incidence of PTSD goes up with the number of tours and amount of combat experienced.”

  • This is a casual claim. The author is describing the cause and affect relationship between battle and PTSD.
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1 Response to Claims – Halizzle

  1. davidbdale says:

    “He is one of 103,200 or 228,875, or 336,000 Americans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and came back with PTSD,”

    This is a factual claim. The author has stated a circumstance that exists beyond doubt. This statistic is factual and can not be disputed.

    That’s odd. Which statistic is factual, Halizzle? That 103,200 Americans have PTSD? Or that 228,875 do? Or that 336,000 do?

    “Even when everyone’s in the family room watching TV, it’s only connected to Netflix and not to cable, since news is often a trigger.”

    This is an evaluative claim. The author is blaming the news for triggering PTSD symptoms, this raises questions of how and if the news should be monitored.

    Intriguing but also a bit confusing. Clearly the author does blame the news for triggering symptoms, but are you suggesting the news broadcasters monitor what they broadcast, or that someone in the house should monitor what’s screened in the living room?

    “Their German shepherd, a service dog trained to help veterans with PTSD”

    This is a definition claim. The author introduces a concept, a service dog, and tells us what it is “a dog trained to help veterans”

    Nice. Definition claim, or Categorical: dog belongs to the category of trained service dogs.

    “Some hypotheses for why PTSD only tortures some trauma victims blame it on unhappily coded proteins or a misbehaving amygdala. Family history, or maybe previous trauma.”

    This is a categorical claim. These are all examples of how somebody could develop PTSD.

    It is somewhat categorical. It’s also an attempt to make a causal claim. One or all, or none, of these hypothetical factors causes PTSD.

    “In soldiers, the incidence of PTSD goes up with the number of tours and amount of combat experienced.”

    This is a casual claim. The author is describing the cause and affect relationship between battle and PTSD.

    I agree with the analysis. Two corrections: 1) CAUSAL claim, not CASUAL claim; 2) cause and EFFECT, not AFFECT.

    It’s time to start catching up with what you’ve missed, Halizzle. Meet for a Conference. Respond to Feedback for your My Hypothesis post. Show me something impressive on your White Paper. A week from Monday your first 1000-word essay will be due on your Hypothesis. I have faith, but you need to reassure me if you want to avoid my nagging.

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