APA Citation

In-text APA Citation

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,” the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks. Most people hearing the term “sugary drinks” think of soda exclusively; however, the category is much broader. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sicweetened waters.” In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category. And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull. These drinks are found in most American homes and often considered healthy. But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.

References

Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences. (2016, December 15). Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html

Keast, D., Fulgoni, V., Nicklas, T., & O’Neil, C. (2013). Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006. Nutrients5(1), 283–301. MDPI AG. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu5010283

Mallonee, L. F., Boyd, L. D., & Stegeman, C. (2017). A scoping review of skills and tools oral health professionals need to engage children and parents in dietary changes to prevent childhood obesity and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 77. doi:10.1111/jphd.12237

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Pomeranz, J. L., Munsell, C. R., & Harris, J. L. (2013). Energy drinks: An emerging public health hazard for youth. Journal of Public Health Policy, 34(2), 254-271. doi:10.1057/jphp.2013.6

I see the model. Now, how does it work?

When the author of this argument about sugary drinks makes a reference to an academic journal, website, or magazine article in her essay, she quotes or paraphrases the article’s content and provides enough details in the text to help readers find the source in the References list.

Example 1 (Publisher and Title, plus Quote):

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences, the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks.

Example 2 (Publisher plus quote):

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Example 3 (Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category.

Example 4 (Name of Journal, Title of Article, plus Paraphrase):

And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull.

Example 5 (Author, Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.


Exercise

YOUR TURN TO CREATE IN-TEXT CITATION:
In a Reply below, read the paragraph below, excerpted from a recent article in the New York Times.

  • Create a brief statement about something the author says.
  • Decide for yourself who the Author is.
    • Do you want to quote Jacob Goldstein, the author of the book?
    • Or do you want to quote Richard Davies, the author of the book review?
  • In creating your statement, use natural language and the in-text citation technique to provide the bibliographic information a reader would need to trace your source.
  • Decide for yourself what bibliographic information is essential.
  • Decide for yourself whether paraphrase, or direct quotation, or a combination is the best way to deliver the author’s meaning.
Jacob Goldstein is a host of NPR’s “Planet Money.” His new book features the show’s trademark storytelling: fast-paced and chatty.

Of all the inventions we rely on to get through the day, nothing is as strange as money. Currency is a national bedrock that sits alongside anthems and flags; our cash — from pristine $100 bills to dog-eared 5 pound notes — seems solid, official and enduring. At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money. The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith — is the central theme of “Money,” a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.

The main thread is set out right away: Money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,” Goldstein asserts. But it’s really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools — ways to exchange goods and services.

60 Responses to APA Citation

  1. profs22 says:

    In an excerpt by Richard Davies named “The Fiction that Makes the World go Round”, he states, ” The evolving paradox of modern currency is the central theme of “Money,” a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.”

    • davidbdale says:

      Couple things, Profs22.
      —You don’t cite an excerpt. You’re citing a book review.
      —Your capitalization doesn’t match the capitalization of the review title.
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 7 comma placement
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 11 single and double quotes

  2. clementine102 says:

    According to “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round”, Richard Davies explains that the central theme of “Money” by Jacob Goldstein is that there is an ever-changing paradox of modern currency.

    • davidbdale says:

      Nice work, but,
      —I know you didn’t have access to italics in your Reply, clementine, but the title Money, because it’s a book, should be italicized.
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 7 comma placement

  3. bigblue821 says:

    In the book “Money: The true story of a made up thing” by Jacob Goldstein, he believes that present currency is both essentially social and also cold and mathematical. I agree with this statement, currency is a must in any society but it also is unforgiving and harsh if you get caught on the wrong end of it.

    • davidbdale says:

      It’s no fault of yours, BigBlue, because it’s hard to know how to italicize in the Reply field, but a book title (and publications in general) requires italics. So, reflecting that:

      In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, by Jacob Goldstein, he believes that present currency is essentially social.

      I’ve shortened the quote for space.

      • davidbdale says:

        Then, just for the sake of elegance, I’d make this change, which you can always consider, using fewer pronouns in these citations:

        In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, Jacob Goldstein claims that present currency is essentially social.

        Here I’ve also replaced “believes” with “claims” because, while we don’t know for sure what he believes, we do know what he said.

  4. davidbdale says:

    In his New York Times book review named “The Fiction that Makes the World go Round,” Richard Davies states, “The evolving paradox of modern currency is the central theme of Money, a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.”

  5. rowanstudent24 says:

    According to Richard Davies in a book review titled The Fiction That Makes The World Go Round, “At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

    • davidbdale says:

      Good work RS, except that the title of the article needs quotation marks.
      “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.”
      And yes, that will result in a weird-looking clash of quotation marks.

      According to Richard Davies in a book review titled “The Fiction That Makes The World Go Round,” “At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

      That’s legal but odd, so you might want to reorganize. For example,
      Richard Davies, in a book review titled “The Fiction That Makes The World Go Round,” observes that “money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

      Look good?

  6. cardinal7218 says:

    In his book Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing, Jacob Goldstein contends that money is an “unalterably social” construct rather than the “cold and mathematical” concept it is often thought as.

    • davidbdale says:

      Nice work, Cardinal. In your uncorrected version, you neglected the / before the em that would have closed out your italics command. I have fixed that for you. The rest is quite elegant.

  7. runnerd4 says:

    According to Richard Davies in his book review in the New York Times, he thinks that, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, by Jacob Goldstein displays the idea that it is strange for humans to use money as a form of exchange.

    • runnerd4 says:

      According to Richard Davies in his book review in the New York Times, he thinks that Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, by Jacob Goldstein, displays the idea that it is strange for humans to use money as a form of exchange.

      • davidbdale says:

        These are both really nice, RunnerD4. I closed out your italics with a slash in the right place.
        em between a “less than” and a “more than” begins italics
        /em between a “less than” and a “more than” ends italics

  8. SmilingDogTheProfWants says:

    Richard Davies claims “money is a confidence trick; an i.o.u.” and insists it’s fuel for an “evolving paradox.” in his book review “The Fiction That Makes the World go Round,” published in the New York Times.

    • davidbdale says:

      Richard Davies claims that “money is a confidence trick; an i.o.u.” and insists it’s fuel for an “evolving paradox” in his book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World go Round,” published in the New York Times.

  9. Nimadhury says:

    Richard Davies in his book review titled Fiction That Makes the World Go Round he states “nothing is as strange as money”, in reference to Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing.

    • davidbdale says:

      Bunch of problems here, Nima,
      Richard Davies, in his book review titled “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” states that “nothing is as strange as money,” in reference to Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing.

  10. thecommoncase says:

    The concept of money, when you really think about it, is quite ridiculous. We exchange paper for other paper, such as toilet paper and paper towels. In his book review titled “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round”, Richard Davies remarks how “…money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

  11. jeffbezos123 says:

    Richard Davies book review, “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing” I love how he says money is “cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships”. This shows us money is just a thing a made up object and is not a source of happiness.

    • davidbdale says:

      Bunch of problems here, JB.
      —Your first “sentence” isn’t a sentence.
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 13 Possessives
      —You got the title of the book review wrong. It’s “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.”
      —Fails for Grammar Rule 7 period placement

  12. shadowswife says:

    According to Richard Davies’ book review, “The Fiction that Makes the World go Round”, he claims that “money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

    • davidbdale says:

      Nice work overall but for a couple of things,
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 7 comma placement
      —Uses 2 instances of “said language” (According to) (he claims)
      You could say that According to Davies SOMEONE ELSE claims something, but it’s wrong to say that According to Davies, Davies says . . . .

  13. cucumberlemonadee says:

    In the book review by Richard Davies “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.”,He states ” The main thread is set out right away: Money ‘seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,’ Goldstein asserts. But it’s really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. “. meaning that the current currency is a social construct and cold or mathematical.

    • davidbdale says:

      I have no idea what’s going on with your periods and commas, CL.
      In the book review by Richard Davies, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” he states, “The main thread is set out right away: Money ‘seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,’ Goldstein asserts. But it’s really ‘a made-up thing, a shared fiction,'” meaning that the current currency is, in Goldstein’s words “a social construct” and “cold or mathematical.”

      Something like that, except that you would want to identify Goldstein as the author of the book being reviewed and probably offer up its title. I admire that you wanted to do a complex citation of both the book and the review, but it’s harder than it looks.

  14. cfriery says:

    In the New York Times article titled The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round (italic), Richard Davies states how money has moved from a sensible commodity currency such as, “salt, or coins made from precious metal,” to cash because it is a, “tool”. In other words, if an entire society were to suddenly start believing that cash wasn’t worth anything, then it wouldn’t be worth the paper it was written on.

    • davidbdale says:

      Bunch of problems here, CF
      In the New York Times book review titled “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies states that money has moved from a sensible commodity currency such as “salt, or coins made from precious metal,” to cash because it is a “tool.” In other words, if an entire society were to suddenly start believing that cash wasn’t worth anything, then it wouldn’t be worth the paper it was written on.

  15. BigBarry2 says:

    According to “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round”, Richard Davies states “The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith — is the central theme of “Money,” a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein”.

    • davidbdale says:

      Bunch of things here, BB
      In his book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies states, “The evolving paradox of modern currency—foundational yet resting on faith—is the central theme of Money, a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.”

      Also, if you’re going to quote the title of the book, you should quote the entire title.

  16. bluntwriting88 says:

    In RIchard Davie’s book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Davies states how money is, “A confidence trick… that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Many economists have realized and analyzed money in this way, with most nations operating on this fundamental ‘fiat’ principle.

    • davidbdale says:

      Bunch of things here, Blunt
      In his book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies states THAT money is “a confidence trick… that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Many economists have realized and analyzed money in this way, with most nations operating on this fundamental “fiat” principle.

      —Yours named the author twice (According to Davies, Davies said)
      —We EXPLAIN how, but we STATE that.
      —When blending a quote into your own grammar, don’t lead with a comma, don’t capitalize the first word. (money is “a confidence trick)
      —Fails For Grammar Rule 13 possessives (A review by Davies is Davies’ review)
      —Fails for Grammar Rule 11 double quotes

  17. sunshine2818 says:

    The Author, Richard Davies, expressed that “money” tends to be represented as a “tool”. This is in replacement of regular goods like salt, in order to give more ways to exchange services.

    • davidbdale says:

      Richard Davies, the author of “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” a review of Money: The True Story of a Made-up Thing, expressed that money tends to be represented as a “tool.” This is in replacement of regular goods like salt, in order to give more ways to exchange services.

  18. goldin92 says:

    Actual Money, is just a piece of paper, just something that humans created to differentiate themselves from one another, to brag to the other or to create power. In his book review titled “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round”, Richard Davies says how money only shows power and stability, and gives self confidence and reliability with people, doesn’t really make your life “happy”

    • davidbdale says:

      Actual money is just a piece of paper, something that humans created to differentiate ourselves from one another, to brag to the other or to create power. In his book review titled “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies says that money only shows power and stability, gives self confidence and reliability to people, and doesn’t really make our lives happy.

  19. pardonmyfrench13 says:

    A book review by Richard Davies, that was published by the New York Times called ” The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round” states, “The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith — is the central theme of “Money,” a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.”

  20. dayzur says:

    In the book review by Richard Davis, “The Fiction the Makes the World Go Round.”, it is stated by the author states the change in money as societies progressed by saying “The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that valuable because they are tools”. What he means by this is that money has no actual value and is just a piece of paper ,compared to items with actual value of the past societies.

    • davidbdale says:

      In his book review, “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies explains the change in money as societies progressed by saying, “The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools.” What he means by this is that money has no actual value and is just a piece of paper compared to items with actual value of past societies.

  21. sonnypetro29 says:

    In the book “Money”, Jacob Goldstein says “it’s really a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” Richard Davies who reviews the book “Money” in a New York Times article says its ” The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith.”

  22. l8tersk8ter says:

    According to Richard Davies in his book review of Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing money is one of the strangest inventions that is now an everyday item heavily relied on. This paradox of currency in the modern world is the foundation of Goldstein’s book.

    • davidbdale says:

      According to Richard Davies in his book review of Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, money is one of the strangest inventions that is now an everyday item heavily relied on. This paradox of currency in the modern world is the foundation of Goldstein’s book.

    • l8tersk8ter says:

      According to Richard Davies in his book review of Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing , money is one of the strangest inventions that is now an everyday item heavily relied on. This paradox of currency in the modern world is the foundation of Goldstein’s book.

  23. comicdub says:

    In his book review of “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing”, Richard Davies makes the claim that “Currency is a national bedrock that sits alongside anthems and flags…”. To put it in simpler terms, Davies believes that money is one of the main foundations of this country.

  24. mesrurerowan says:

    In his book The Interpretation of Dreams, Sigmund Freud claims that lazy minds too often prefer conservatism in order to stay in their comfort zone, instead of adopting themselves to fast changing conditions. It explains us why most conservative people are not willing to change their habits and ideas; because once you start doing it, you need to put an efford.

    • davidbdale says:

      In his book The Interpretation of Dreams, Sigmund Freud claims that lazy minds too often prefer conservatism in order to stay in their comfort zone, instead of adapting themselves to fast-changing conditions. It explains why most conservative people are not willing to change their habits and ideas because once begun, the process requires effort.

  25. gooferious says:

    Included in the New York Times, Richard Davies added his insight regarding money from the article, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing written by Jacob Goldstein. Davies discusses how society ultimately took the value of paper money as a way to exchange goods and services stemming from the traditional currencies such as salt and coins made from precious medal.

    • davidbdale says:

      As published in the New York Times, Richard Davies’ book review of Jacob Goldstein’s book, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing discusses how society ultimately took the value of paper money as a way to exchange goods and services stemming from the traditional currencies such as salt and precious metal coins.

  26. rowanstudent says:

    According to a book review by Richard Davies, “The Fiction that makes the World Go Round,” Davies states, “At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Making the reader question, is there really a value? No, money has value because we say it does, and there is nothing more to it.

  27. wafflesrgud22 says:

    The concept of money and currency is a made up concept that has given us structure and become a necessity for life. Jacob Goldstein says it best in his new book “Money”, [ Money] “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships”.

  28. gabythefujoshi18 says:

    In the novel, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing(italics) by Jacob Goldstein, he critiques the value of currency, claiming it to be just fabricated value that society has placed on a means of exchange methodology. Richard Davies, publisher of a review on this novel, further elaborates on this theme by expressing his thoughts on the paradox of our society putting our faith into pieces of paper just to acquire more.

  29. pizzaplanet323 says:

    In the New York Times article, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round”, Richard Davie is expressing how he views the concept of money. “…it’s really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.”” He is trying to make us understand that money has no true value. It is just paper that we placed value to and now we live by that fictional idea that it is everything we need. When overall it has no true value.

  30. mhmokaysure says:

    In the book “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing”, author Jacob Goldstein swiftly suggests that money is not “cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships” instead acknowledging that it is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.”

  31. 612119d says:

    n the book review by Richard Davies “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.”,He states 43Money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,” Goldstein asserts. But it’s really “a made-up thing. If people decide it didn’t matter it wouldn’t..

  32. tcarter101 says:

    In the New York Times book review named “The Fiction that makes the World go Round” David says how money is from a sensible commodity simular to a trade like exchanging salt for grains or wheat or the use of gold and silver into a cash exchange “because it is a tool” giving it the value of of the number printed on it.

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