Bibliography- imgoingswimming

Annotated Bibliography

1.  Brown, A. B. (2020, January 9). Electric Cars Will Challenge State Power Grids. The Pew Charitable Trusts. Retrieved March 29 2021.

Background: This source is PEW saying that state power grids will change thanks to electric cars. The article states multiple statistics on how much electricity production will need to be produced in order to keep up with the new demand.

How I Used It: This source was used to identify how each state has a similar goal, yet having largely different demands. Some states need to produce less than a ten percent difference over the next fifteen years while others need to produce upwards of fifty five percent more energy.

2.  Cars, Trucks, Buses and Air Pollution. (2008, July 18). Union of Concerned Scientists, Retrieved March 30 2021.

Background: The Union of Concerned Scientists talks about negative impacts of technologies on the environment. In this article they talk about air pollution from gasoline and diesel vehicles.

How I Used It: This source was used as a control when comparing emissions of gasoline and diesel cars and the pollution from electricity plants in order to show the similarities.

3.   Commerford, T. M. C. (1905)Electrical Apparatuses and Supplies.. US Census Bereau, Retrieved March 29 2021.

Background: This is the American census from 1905 which catalogs statistics on electrical appliances and supplies.

How I Used It: This was used to talk about how electric vehicles have been around for longer than we think. These electric vehicles power were powered from coal just as our cars are today.

4.  Electric Utilities. (n.d.). American Lung Association. Retrieved April 5, 2021, Retrieved March 29 2021.

Background: This source is the American Lung Association who specializes in talking about pollution and its effect on the human body. This article talks about the chemicals produced along with its health effects.

How I Used It: This source was used to counter that production of electricity for electric vehicles is just as bad as the emissions produced directly from a fossil fuel burning car.

5.   Electric Vehicle Benefits. (n.d.). Energy.Gov. Retrieved March 30, 2021.

Background: This article is from the office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This article gives information on negative effects of gasoline vehicles and positives of electric vehicles.

How I Used It: I used this article in order to counter some of its arguments. Some of these arguments are stretched or used language to say electric vehicles are better when they are not. I referenced different quotes throughout the my paper.

6.   Electricity in the U.S..- U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). (n.d.). U.S. Energy Information Administration. Retrieved March 29, 2021. 

Background: This source is the U.S. Energy Information Administration who gives statistics on energy consumption. This page on the website specifically talks about statistics in the U.S. on energy consumption

How I Used It: I used this source to give information on what percent of our energy is not clean in the United States. This source was also used to compare our energy production to the production of other countries’ energy.

7.  Environmental Impacts of Solar Power. (2013d, March 5). Union of Concerned Scientists, Retrieved April 10 2021.

Background: This source is the Union of Concerned Scientists who talk about negative impacts of certain technologies such as the environmental impacts of solar power.

How I Used It: This source was used to identify the downsides of solar energy. This source was used as a counter argument to why it is hard to achieve 100% total clean energy when powering our vehicles and how we can not just use the argument of turning to solar as a fallback.

8.   Fast Facts on Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. (2020, July 29). US EPA, Retrieved April 14 2021.

Background: This source is the United States Environmental protection agency. This source gives information on what percent of pollution is produced from each sector in the United states like transportation, electricity, and industry.

How I Used It:  I used this source to compare the minimal difference between pollution of electricity and the transportation sector. I also used this to talk about the percent that is from passenger cars. Later this was used to say we should focus on heavy duty vehicles because of their almost twenty percent contribution to the transportation sector of pollution.

9.  Gasoline Phaseouts Around The World. (n.d.). Coltura – Moving beyond Gasoline. Retrieved March 29, 2021.

Background: This source is a non profit organization whose goal is a gasoline free America. The source has a list of different states, cities, and countries goals regarding phasing out gasoline vehicles.

How I Used It: This source offers information regarding when it is believed we will start phasing out gasoline vehicles. I used this to give dates that each state is expecting to reach this goal so that people may understand that we will be going to electric cars in the very soon future. I also use this source to show many states have the same goals even though they have much different challenges.

10.   International China- U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).(n.d.). U.S. Energy Information Administration. Retrieved April 3, 2021.

Background: This source is the U.S. Energy Information Administration speaking on energy production in China. This gives statistics on what percent of power is produced by dirty energy.

How I Used It: I used this source to compare energy production in China versus the United States and India. I used this to say how hard it would be for other countries to try to reach the same goals we are setting. This is especially hard for countries that need to produce so much energy and don’t care about their effect on the planet.

11.   International India- U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). (n.d.-b). U.S. Energy Information Administration. Retrieved April 4, 2021. 

Background: This source is the U.S. Energy Information Administration speaking on energy production in India. This gives statistics on what percent of power is produced by dirty energy.

How I Used It: I used this source to compare energy production against the United States and China. I used this because India has some of the dirtiest energy in the world. I used this to say it would be almost impossible for India to reach clean energy in the next thirty years

12.   The Environmental Impact of Lithium Batteries. (2020, November 12). IER. Retrieved April 5 2021. 

Background: This source is the Institute for Energy Research which talks about the environmental effects of lithium mining. They say that lithium mining has huge environmental effects on our planet from the pollution of water which also affects nearby communities.

How I Used It: I used this source to talk about the negative effects from electric cars themselves. Most electric cars need lithium in their batteries in order to function. I talked about how this mining pollutes water and leaves nearby communities having to find water in other places. The demand for lithium mining will just increase over the next ten years and increase this pollution. 

13. U.S. Fire Administration. (2019, June 18). Coffee Break Bulletin. Retrieved April 5 2021. 

Background: This source is the U.S. Fire Administration. This source provides firefights information on how to put out an electric vehicles fire and the different challenges that come unlike gasoline or diesel car fires. This source talks about why they may start and the pollution emitted from these chemicals in these vehicles batteries.

How I Used It: This source was used to talk about why electric vehicle fires can happen with no warning and also gives the reader an idea of how many toxic chemicals make up an electric car battery.

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2 Responses to Bibliography- imgoingswimming

  1. davidbdale says:

    Your urls were so long they were displaying off the right edge of the blog, Swimming, so I linked them to the article titles. You should be able to figure out how to do that too, if you’re willing. Takes about a minute.

    I see a problem with your 2-3-4 series. The link for 2 and 3 go to the identical page, but they’re described differently. The explanation for 3 and 4 go to different pages, but they’re described identically. Clearly a cut-and-paste problem there.

    As for your question, if you used different articles at the same website, as it appears you have done, each of them has a different identity as indicated by their titles. Give each its own listing but be careful to link them all the way to the PAGE for the article. For example, if you used the article, “US Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2019,” use this link, which still directs readers to the EIA, but sends them to the CO2 page:
    https://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/carbon/

    OK?

    Like

  2. imgoingswimming says:

    Thank you for your feedback, I was rearranging everything on my page once I was questioning if I needed a source for each page on the same EIA website and did not realize I messed up my previous bibliography on other articles. You were correct with the cut and past problem. I will be sure to add my additional sources on EIA. Thank you.

    Like

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