Claims-Daphneblake

“If she’s not saving lives on the phone or blogging, she’s offering support via Facebook, where thousands of Family of a Vet users and nearly 500 FOV volunteers congregate and commiserate.”

-the author uses an evaluation claim for this sentence. “thousands of Family of a Vet users and nearly 500 FOV volunteers”, are the witnesses and the evidence that she does this on her spare time.

“I am now more hypervigilant than my husband,” 

-this is an analogy claim because Kateri Peterson is comparing her hyper vigilant to that of her husband’s.

“Kateri’s eight-year-old son now also counts the exits in new spaces he enters, points them out to his loved ones, keeps a mental map of them at the ready, until war or fire fails to break out, and everyone is safely back home.”

-there is a vague use of numerical claims here with “eight year old son now also counts new spaces…”

-an evaluation claim is also present with, “points them out to his loved ones”, the loved ones are the evidence of this scene.

“She’s not a normal kid. She does things, and says things. She’s a grown-up in a six-year-old’s body in a lot of ways.”

-this would be a categorical claim since she’s not grouping the girl in the category with normal kids.

Katie Vines.” Brannan is stern but impeccably patient”

-could be seen as a factual claim or definition claim to her personality

In the wake of Vietnam, 38 percent of marriages failed within the first six months of a veteran’s return stateside; the divorce rate was twice as high for vets with PTSD as for those without. Vietnam vets with severe PTSD are 69 percent more likely to have their marriages fail than other vets. Army records also show that 65 percent of active-duty suicides, which now outpace combat deaths, are precipitated by broken relationships. And veterans, well, one of them dies by suicide every 80 minutes. But even ignoring that though vets make up 7 percent of the United States, they account for 20 percent of its suicides—or that children and teenagers of a parent who’s committed suicide are three times more likely to kill themselves, too—or a whole bunch of equally grim statistics, Brannan’s got her reasons for sticking it out with Caleb.

-lots of numerical and quantitative claims;

-“38 percent of marriages failed within the first six months”

-and also multiple factual claims

-“active-duty suicides, which now outpace combat deaths, are precipitated by broken relationships.”

“That’s when her symptoms got worse, precipitating another meltdown, this time at a steak house where she took him to celebrate his newfound calm. “

-this is a causal claim. The cause of her symptoms getting worse was another meltdown.

 

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2 Responses to Claims-Daphneblake

  1. daphneblake25 says:

    For feedback i would like to know if my claims are correct and make sense for the selections i chose from the reading.

  2. davidbdale says:

    If she’s not saving lives on the phone or blogging, she’s offering support via Facebook, where thousands of Family of a Vet users and nearly 500 FOV volunteers congregate and commiserate.

    –The author uses an evaluation claim for this sentence. “thousands of Family of a Vet users and nearly 500 FOV volunteers”, are the witnesses and the evidence that she does this on her spare time.

    I don’t disagree that you have an evaluation claim here, DB, but I think you missed the obvious one, that the author has listened to Brannan and concluded that she’s “saving lives.” The smaller claim that she offers support should be easier to observe and require less evaluating.

    I am now more hypervigilant than my husband,

    –This is an analogy claim because Kateri Peterson is comparing her hypervigilance to that of her husband.

    You’re right to point out the comparison, DB, so I wonder why you didn’t just call this a Comparative claim. It does require evaluation on Brannan’s part (a rough numerical equation: twice as much). But it’s not an analogy to compare hypervigilance with hypervigilance. Analogies point out similarities between terms that are not obviously similar, like PTSD and influenza.

    Kateri’s eight-year-old son now also counts the exits in new spaces he enters, points them out to his loved ones, keeps a mental map of them at the ready, until war or fire fails to break out, and everyone is safely back home.

    –There is a vague use of numerical claims here with “eight year old son now also counts new spaces…”
    Do you think so? I’d say the point of this text is to make a Similarity claim between the son’s behavior (very odd for an eight-year-old who has not been to a war zone) with some post-trauma combatant’s (presumably Katerie’s spouse) more understandable behavior.

    –An evaluation claim is also present with, “points them out to his loved ones.” The loved ones are the evidence of this scene.
    I see what you’re doing, DB, but it’s not necessary. You’re not obligated to find the evidence for a claim. There is certainly evaluation going on here, mostly in Katerie’s mind. We depend on her for the claims here. The author has not independently verified the son’s behavior. Katerie reports from her own observations what she believes is going on inside her son’s head.

    She’s not a normal kid. She does things, and says things. She’s a grown-up in a six-year-old’s body in a lot of ways.

    –This would be a categorical claim since she’s not grouping the girl in the category with normal kids.
    I completely agree.

    Katie Vines.” Brannan is stern but impeccably patient.

    –Could be seen as a factual claim or definition claim to her personality.
    Both good choices, DB, among others. And here we see how flexible the categories can be and how little it matters whether we necessarily agree. This characterization of Brannan could be called Qualitative, Factual, Categorical, or Evaluative.

    In the wake of Vietnam, 38 percent of marriages failed within the first six months of a veteran’s return stateside; the divorce rate was twice as high for vets with PTSD as for those without. Vietnam vets with severe PTSD are 69 percent more likely to have their marriages fail than other vets. Army records also show that 65 percent of active-duty suicides, which now outpace combat deaths, are precipitated by broken relationships. And veterans, well, one of them dies by suicide every 80 minutes. But even ignoring that though vets make up 7 percent of the United States, they account for 20 percent of its suicides—or that children and teenagers of a parent who’s committed suicide are three times more likely to kill themselves, too—or a whole bunch of equally grim statistics, Brannan’s got her reasons for sticking it out with Caleb.

    –Lots of numerical and quantitative claims;
    –“38 percent of marriages failed within the first six months”

    –And also multiple factual claims
    –“active-duty suicides, which now outpace combat deaths, are precipitated by broken relationships.”

    And SO much more. Lengthy sections like this one contain dozens of claims.

    That’s when her symptoms got worse, precipitating another meltdown, this time at a steak house where she took him to celebrate his newfound calm.

    –This is a causal claim. The cause of her symptoms getting worse was another meltdown.
    No doubt about it.

    Daphne, whether we agree or not on the labels for these claim types, I hope the value of the exercise is clear: To make us all more cognizant as we read that we’re being persuaded by claiims in even the most straightforward, apparently “factual” texts. In other words, all writing is ARGUMENT.

    Good?

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