Rebuttal — SmilingDogTheProfWants

How Can A Child Be At Blame?

Though obesity is the specified issue, the suggested solution also covers a wide variety of other issues that play a factor in obesity and that’s how I see this best handled. Each and every one of these has a different side of the argument but my goal is to convince that there is logical reasoning with my words and that implementing some of these covered ideas can have positive effects not only on your children, but your siblings, cousins or friends, but also your life as well because it creates some independence for your kid. 

It’s no secret that businesses target children for their advertisements even if they claim they don’t. Mcdonalds sold ridiculously unhealthy apples with caramel to entice kids into begging their parents and keeping them there with their small jungle areas that the kids love to play in. Kids are learning every single day from their experience and though they may not fully understand right away it is something they can come to understand if you talk to them. They won’t understand that businesses are targeting them or if they do they won’t care because the product being displayed to them is what they want; what is important is to teach them that they don’t need the newest device or the cheesiest pizza to fulfill their wants and that a little resolve can lead to better things. 

It’s human nature to pick what stimulates more and this applies to some adults too. The lack of impulse control is expected in a child and I don’t expect them to make the right choice every time, but it’s important that they understand that some things are either good for them or better than others. It’s important for them to go outside and play over sitting at home watching a YouTube video because it’s easier for them to make friends and keep active. A good friend keeps you in a good state of mind and if they like to play together then it will also keep them both physically active. There is the aspect of online games that they can play with their friends on but young children shouldn’t spend all of their time on here as it does help the mind but it is also important to care for the body. A child would much rather play outside if they had the tools to do it over playing a game. If a child enjoyed playing a game where you build things then they would be more inclined to building forts outside and creating their own games with them, which are fantastic memories for young kids. 

The parents are to blame not the kids. It is true, and irrefutable that parents have sway in how their kids act and turn out, but the parents aren’t the determinant. The child has to take these things into account when they make choices because they affect their future in ways that they would never imagine. Parents can’t always be around with work or present with the kids while they’re at school but when the parents play as much of an active role as they can for their child then it’s clear that the child doesn’t want to help themself despite knowing the consequences. No good parent would force a kid to do something they absolutely don’t want to do unless the child was required to do it because that creates the issue of the kid not wanting to do it again. 

Businessnesses advertise to children to get them to drag their parents there because the kids really liked what they saw and feel that they need to have it or something will happen, but a parent can’t always give them what they want or have the time to take them. It is important to note that a child won’t understand the issues with obesity because they either can’t fathom the consequences or that if they are overweight they don’t see or experience the issues down the line like a lack of mobility and energy. A child is a precious thing that should be cared for but that doesn’t mean that they don’t have their own thoughts and will to do what they please.

References

Institute, O. M., Board, O. H. P. A. D., Food, A. N. B., & Committee, O. P. O. O. I. (2005). Preventing childhood obesity : Health in the balance. ProQuest Ebook Central https://ebookcentral.proquest.com 

Committee, O. O. P. P. F., Institute, O. M., & Early, C. O. P. P. (2011). Early childhood obesity prevention policies. ProQuest Ebook Central https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

Smith, C. (1999). Understanding childhood obesity. ProQuest Ebook Central https://ebookcentral.proquest.com

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2 Responses to Rebuttal — SmilingDogTheProfWants

  1. SmilingDogTheProfWants says:

    My main issue with the rebuttal is that I can’t convince a reader of my side of the story, I believe that the issue lies in what I aim to convince of (which btw the first paragraph is awful and will get extensive attention when using my hypothesis in the future, I just believed that the arguments were more important for the final paper). Again, the issue that I could use help with is making my arguments more convincing when the argument I make is based on how you think a situation should be judged.

  2. davidbdale says:

    I will return AFTER you respond to the extensive feedback I just provided on your Causal Argument, SmilingDog.
    But I will say this:
    1. You haven’t cited a single source. Nor is it obvious that you’ve made use of any academic research. I see that same arguments here as in your Causal argument with no references to the material you have included in your References section.
    2. I find it very hard to figure out which side of the argument you’re defending here. You actually say, “The parents are to blame not the kids,” which, I’m certain, is the precise opposite of the thesis you present in the Causal argument. The purpose of the Rebuttal argument is NOT to argue against YOURSELF. The Rebuttal argument is your chance to refute the best argument SOMEONE ELSE, a Worthy Opponent, has made to counter your own thesis.

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