Rebuttal-nousernamefound1

No More Excuses

We must stop believing that making something “Free” is the best way to solve things. We shouldn’t have a limit on something that is going to benefit us for a lifetime. Students should focus more on the learning aspect than the money aspect. Teachers are putting students in the right direction to become successful, but students are more focused on the aftermath. Students are put into the top of the line dorms, introduced to groups that are focused on them, put in small size classes for easier learning, and have a bunch of people that have their back throughout the 4 years. Things like this will cost a bunch, but not too much where your pockets are empty for the rest of your life. Many people believe that tuition is high when looking at schools out of state. Some state schools give less financial aid to out-of-state students, which is why things can get a little expensive. Farran Powell in “Explore the Top Public National Universities,” claims that “Public colleges and universities often do not give enough financial aid to out-of-state students to make it an affordable option.” The problem is the student aid, not the tuition, so the claim is false. The HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center claims that “The average tuition for an in-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $6,752. The average tuition for an out-of-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $15,742.” Going to a four-year college in-state should be your first option before you look out-of-state. This is a problem, but you can’t sit around and become used by the system. Stop making the mistake of going out of state to make your dreams come true. That out-of-state school will give you the same information that an in-state school would.

When dealing with paying for college education, you should know how to get free money. In reality, a lot of students don’t understand how to qualify for more money. Students can find free money in Scholarships, Grants, Volunteer organizations, Athletics, Churches, etc. Christy Rakoczy in “Experts Reveal 19 Best Places to Find Free Money for College,” claims that “Plenty of students find scholarships and grants. In fact, college students received a total of $125.4 billion in grant money during the 2016-17 academic year.” As a student, you determine how you want to live your four years of college. You can either be stressed out or stress-free. We have a lot of organizations out there that understand that a lot of people need help when expanding their education. The claim that we haven’t made a step towards helping out students is false. The real issue is the students being too lazy and not wanting help. Most of the time students are turning down free money because they don’t feel like typing a 500-word essay. Yes, they have some scammers out there on online sites, but you can ask your guidance counselor about legit ones. You can also work for school while attending. This will help pay off some of the debt or eliminate some of the fees you are paying for. Becoming an RA may help you in the long run. When you become an RA, you are rewarded free room and board. Students must take advantage of the opportunities that are out there or they will suffer. Lowering tuition will be a process that will take a lot of years, so, for now, students must look into things that will help them pay for college. Christy Rakoczy in “Experts Reveal 19 Best Places to Find Free Money for College,” claims that “most students who start in their junior year of high school should be able to get at least some free money — usually around $300 to $5,000 — if they exhaust their options for free funding. The key is to get going and keep trying to apply until you hit the jackpot.”

Stop thinking community colleges aren’t good for your education. Going to a community college for 2 years will help reduce the cost of college education. 2-year colleges have some drawbacks, but that’s everything in life. Heather Levin in “Benefits of Attending Community College for 2 Years to Save Money,” claims that “Community colleges typically charge $45 to $250 per credit hour, depending on where you go and your residency status. So, if your local community college charges $125 per credit hour, each class will cost you $375, which means you’re saving up to $1,425 per class.” Community colleges will also help you improve your transcript. Improving your transcript can give you the chase to attend that dream school of yours without worry about the money. You still have high-quality professors while attending a community college, so why not start there? You may lose some of your credits when it’s time to travel, which is why you should look into universities that some two-year schools have agreements with. Don’t let this opportunity slip away because you will never be able to get something better than this. 45$-$250 for a class is something that you cannot beat. We often look for sympathy when looking for the change, instead of finding another path. Don’t complain about not having fun in school when you’re the reason for not having fun. Students are too worried about getting away from parents and going buck wild. This is why you see a lot of people bashing community colleges. They just want that experience of craziness. Tuition is a problem, but it doesn’t have to be a problem for students. In other words, it’s your choice if you want to suffer from student debt. Community colleges, in-state schools, and scholarships all help students lower the cost of tuition. “Free” will not be the answer to this problem. People would just go to college for the parties if a college education was free. We need to remember that staff needs money too and if the school isn’t being funding how can they pay them for their efforts.

Reference:

Benefits of Attending Community College for 2 Years to Save Money. (2019, February 13). Retrieved from https://www.moneycrashers.com/benefits-of-community-college/

Explore the Top Public National Universities. (2018, September 25). Retrieved March 31, 2019, from https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/slideshows/explore-the-10-top-public-national-universities

In-State vs. Out-of-State Tuition. Retrieved March 31, 2019, from https://www.heath.gwu.edu/state-vs-out-state-tuition

Rakoczy, C. (2018, February 09). 19 Places to Find Free Money for College. Retrieved from https://studentloanhero.com/featured/free-money-for-college-grants-scholarships/

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5 Responses to Rebuttal-nousernamefound1

  1. davidbdale says:

    Your post breaks the ban against 2nd person language 25 times, NUNF!
    You love that YOU language!
    Check your other posts for this violation too. It appears to be a familiar habit.

  2. davidbdale says:

    You make big arguments, NUNF, and you lay out claims like a casino poker dealer, side by side, not touching one another, unrelated, each one important but patternless. You’ve dealt nearly half a deck by the time your first paragraph ends. What you don’t do is organize them into suits, then arrange them numerically. A good argument should look like 2 of hearts, 3 of hearts, 4 of hearts, 5 of hearts, 6 of hearts, straight flush, take the pot.

  3. davidbdale says:

    Let’s look at your first paragraph:

    We must stop believing that making something “Free” is the best way to solve things. We shouldn’t have a limit on something that is going to benefit us for a lifetime. Students should focus more on the learning aspect than the money aspect. Teachers are putting students in the right direction to become successful, but students are more focused on the aftermath. Students are put into the top of the line dorms, introduced to groups that are focused on them, put in small size classes for easier learning, and have a bunch of people that have their back throughout the 4 years. Things like this will cost a bunch, but not too much where your pockets are empty for the rest of your life. Many people believe that tuition is high when looking at schools out of state. Some state schools give less financial aid to out-of-state students, which is why things can get a little expensive. Farran Powell in “Explore the Top Public National Universities,” claims that “Public colleges and universities often do not give enough financial aid to out-of-state students to make it an affordable option.” The problem is the student aid, not the tuition, so the claim is false. The HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center claims that “The average tuition for an in-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $6,752. The average tuition for an out-of-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $15,742.” Going to a four-year college in-state should be your first option before you look out-of-state. This is a problem, but you can’t sit around and become used by the system. Stop making the mistake of going out of state to make your dreams come true. That out-of-state school will give you the same information that an in-state school would.

    Whew. That’s a lot of words.Could it possibly be one main idea supported with details? Suppose we divide it every time there’s a new main idea expressed.

    College is Expensive but Worth the Price.

    We must stop believing that making something “Free” is the best way to solve things. We shouldn’t have a limit on something that is going to benefit us for a lifetime. Students should focus more on the learning aspect than the money aspect. Teachers are putting students in the right direction to become successful, but students are more focused on the aftermath. Students are put into the top of the line dorms, introduced to groups that are focused on them, put in small size classes for easier learning, and have a bunch of people that have their back throughout the 4 years. Things like this will cost a bunch, but not too much where your pockets are empty for the rest of your life.

    Out-of-State Schools are Not Worth the Premium Cost

    Many people believe that tuition is high when looking at schools out of state. Some state schools give less financial aid to out-of-state students, which is why things can get a little expensive. Farran Powell in “Explore the Top Public National Universities,” claims that “Public colleges and universities often do not give enough financial aid to out-of-state students to make it an affordable option.” The problem is the student aid, not the tuition, so the claim is false. The HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center claims that “The average tuition for an in-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $6,752. The average tuition for an out-of-state student at a four-year public school for an undergraduate student was $15,742.” Going to a four-year college in-state should be your first option before you look out-of-state. This is a problem, but you can’t sit around and become used by the system. Stop making the mistake of going out of state to make your dreams come true. That out-of-state school will give you the same information that an in-state school would.

    That helps. They’re still big paragraphs, but one contains all red cards, the other all black cards. By the way, those bold headings are sweet little summaries of the main ideas. There’s no law against writing sentences JUST THAT BLUNT to guide readers to the destination. Now let’s see if the red and black hands are all of the same suit.

  4. davidbdale says:

    College Is Expensive but Worth the Price
    First decide what each sentence contributes to the hand. Are there duplicates here? Discards? Diamonds in a hand of hearts?

    1. We must stop believing that making something “Free” is the best way to solve things.
    2. We shouldn’t have a limit on something that is going to benefit us for a lifetime.
    3. Students should focus more on the learning aspect than the money aspect.
    4. Teachers are putting students in the right direction to become successful, but students are more focused on the aftermath.
    5. Students are put into the top of the line dorms, introduced to groups that are focused on them, put in small size classes for easier learning, and have a bunch of people that have their back throughout the 4 years.
    6. Things like this will cost a bunch, but not too much where your pockets are empty for the rest of your life.

    They’re strong arguments, NUNF, but they don’t flow. They sound like claims from separate arguments. Part of the problem is the lack of transitions. Not once is there a “because,” or a “therefore” to connect a claim to its neighbor.

    What’s the argument value of each sentence?

    1. We must stop believing that making something “Free” is the best way to solve things.
    —Some presidential candidates are proposing free tuition at community colleges for all applicants. My first impression was that you were entering that fray. I was distracted by the notion of free education, which sidelined my understanding of your point. All you mean is that “college is worth paying for, so pay and stop complaining, or find another way to make a living.”

    2. We shouldn’t have a limit on something that is going to benefit us for a lifetime.
    —Now you’ve distracted me in the other direction, NUNF. I don’t think you mean it, but you appear to be suggesting that the sky is the limit. No amount of money spent on college could be too much. So, in two sentences you have me wondering twice what your argument will be.

    3. Students should focus more on the learning aspect than the money aspect.
    —We’re still talking about money and college, but now you suggest I pay no attention to cost but instead attend to the quality of my learning. “learning aspect” and “money aspect” are both needlessly vague.

    4. Teachers are putting students in the right direction to become successful, but students are more focused on the aftermath.
    —Also vague are “in the right direction to become successful” and “focused on the aftermath” but this makes two sentences that suggest education as preparation for life is more important than whatever debt is incurred.

    5. Students are put into the top of the line dorms, introduced to groups that are focused on them, put in small size classes for easier learning, and have a bunch of people that have their back throughout the 4 years.
    —Here you offer an explanation for the high cost of college. Thinking back to Sentence 1, I wonder if anybody believes free tuition to community college would give students access to cushy dorms, social activities, small class sizes, and support staff. There’s a connection between those ideas.

    6. Things like this will cost a bunch, but not too much where your pockets are empty for the rest of your life.
    —Well, that depends, doesn’t it? This conclusion to your first paragraph summarizes the main idea: college is expensive because we ask it to do everything, and then complain about having to pay for it when its dividends last a lifetime.

  5. davidbdale says:

    So. Could we make those arguments by connecting the claims into a narrative?
    College Is Expensive but Worth the Price

    Presidential candidates are campaigning on the so-called “Student debt crisis,” some going so far as to propose free tuition at community colleges for all applicants. But the truth is, the benefits of college outlast the debt for most students who buy wisely. Students who focus on learning a marketable skill at a reasonable cost can avoid both the massive debt and the underemployment that makes it hard to pay off loans. Colleges offer expertise and degrees that can almost guarantee financial success, but at a price. Often, it’s the perks of college life, not the tuition, that saddle graduates with unsustainable debt, so students who demand “the full college experience at the school of my dreams” but pursue degrees that won’t repay that overreach will live to regret their choices. We don’t need presidential candidates to choose affordable schools, resist the expensive add-ons, and study a curriculum that will launch us into profitable careers.

    What do you think? Does that respect the core of your argument and work its way from point to point like a good tour guide?

    I’d like to see you apply the technique to your “second paragraph,” which I amputated from your first, the one about the wisdom of selecting in-state schools.

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