Open Strong- gabythefujoshi

Working Opening 1:

Americans need to stop talking about mental health. The mental health advocates and practitioners that have educated to many the importance of mental illnesses are predominately White Americans. Looking at Ted talks and television, there are mainly Causians advocating mental health awareness. This is what shys away minority groups like Latinos. For the latin community, especially that are first generation immigrants, mental health illness is a “white man’s” problem or that it’s not real. Because of this stigma, children of first generation immigrants don’t get the medical attention needed to treat illnesses like depression or anxiety. There is a lacking number of psychologists and counselors that are part of minority groups like Latinos or African American that publicly speak out about what mental health is, the illnesses, and why it’s important. To rid of the cultural stigma that exists amongst Latino immigrants, there should be better representation of minority groups amongst mental health advocates.

Working Opening 2:

Mental health illness is such a mainstream subject that it’s actually harder to discuss. Mental health topics like depression, suicidal, and anxiety have now become common term, especially in the todays youth that those clinically diagnosed symptoms or illnesses have lost their meaning. They went from something taboo that was reserved and not publicly discussed to something that can be found as a Facebook meme. Perhaps it’s the attempts of Western media to incorporate mental illness representation in different television, movies, and social media posts. In turn, it’s not making people comfortable accepting their issues, but it’s making it more uncomfortable and there still remains a negative connotation to mental illnesses. Normalizing mental health and making it mainstream to the youth of today is more detrimental in the process riding the cultural stigma of mental health.

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1 Response to Open Strong- gabythefujoshi

  1. davidbdale says:

    You’re very thoughtful, GabyTheFujoshi, but you don’t always express your complex ideas clearly.

    Americans need to stop talking about mental health.

    That’s a great opening, but it turns out, you don’t mean it.

    The mental health advocates and practitioners that have educated to many the importance of mental illnesses are predominately White Americans.

    Turns out, you didn’t mean AMERICANS should stop talking; you meant WHITE AMERICANS.

    Looking at TED talks and television, there are mainly Caucasians advocating mental health awareness.

    Now you’re just repeating yourself.

    This is what shys away minority groups like Latinos.

    That’s a VERY NEW CLAIM! But I don’t think you mean this one either. You mean NOT SEEING Latinos talk about mental health convinces them that the problem is not something Latinos SHOULD talk about.

    For the Latin community, especially first generation immigrants, mental health illness is a “white man’s” problem or that it’s not real.

    This is repetitious too, and could be combined with earlier language.

    Because of this stigma, children of first generation immigrants don’t get the medical attention needed to treat illnesses like depression or anxiety.

    This is a strong claim, but you haven’t established a STIGMA, which would involve shame. You’ve only established that Latinos think they may be immune to mental illness, or that Caucasians have the luxury of inventing fake illnesses.

    There is a lacking number of psychologists and counselors that are part of minority groups like Latinos or African American that publicly speak out about what mental health is, the illnesses, and why it’s important.

    I think we’ve covered this.

    To rid of the cultural stigma that exists amongst Latino immigrants, there should be better representation of minority groups amongst mental health advocates.

    I think you already said that too.

    How about this?

    Mental illness is color-blind. It afflicts Latinos just as much as Caucasians, but we don’t get that impression watching TED talks, where virtually all of the presenters are White Americans treating other White Americans. We can’t blame Latinos for concluding that mental illness is a luxury only Whites can afford, while Latinos are too busy suffering with actual physical ailments to worry about whether they might be depressed or anxious. Sadly, children of first generation immigrants don’t get the medical attention needed to treat their mental illnesses, partly because too few psychologists and counselors are Latinos or African Americans. A better representation of minority spokespeople and medical professionals would help rid mental health of its racial stigma.

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