Bibliography – BabyGoat


Annotated Bibliography

  1. “The Effects of Different Types of Music on Mood, Tension, and Mental Clarity”

McCraty, Rollin, et al. “The Effects of Different Types of Music on Mood, Tension, and Mental Clarity.” HeartMath.org, Jan. 1998, http://www.heartmath.org/assets/uploads/2015/01/music-mood-effects.pdf. 

Background: A study was done to see how different music affects the well being of the listener. There were four groups of music tested, grunge rock, new age, designer, and classical. Grunge rock seemed to have a high increase in sadness, tension and hostility, and designer music had a increase in relaxation and mental clarity.

How I used this: I used this information to help explain the relationship the type of music someone listens to and how it affects them consciously. 

  1. “Sad Music Induces Pleasant Emotion”

Kawakami, Ai, et al. “Sad Music Induces Pleasant Emotion.” Frontiers, Frontiers, 14 May 2013, http://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00311/full?library=true. 

Background: With this writing, the writer explains why people listen to music and how it makes the listener feel pleasant. Even though the music is sad, sad music gives the listener a sense of comfort and relatability.

How I used this: I used this in my writing to explain how different emotions of music affects the emotional well-being of the listener.

  1. “The cognitive effects of listening to background music on older adults: processing speed improves with upbeat music, while memory seems to benefit from both upbeat and downbeat music”

Bottiroli, Sara, et al. “The Cognitive Effects of Listening to Background Music on Older Adults: Processing Speed Improves with Upbeat Music, While Memory Seems to Benefit from Both Upbeat and Downbeat Music.” Frontiers, Frontiers, 26 Sept. 2014, http://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00284/full. 

Background: Background music is examined throughout the work. There is a study done with older people to see how they perform with music. We see how different types of music can affect people’s mood and productivity. Music seems to affect arousal, mood and enjoyment, which all in return can affect cognitive performance. Fast tempo music seems to have benefits for tasks tapping processing speed and visuospatial abilities. With that said, it can also have a negative effect in complex tasks. It may be due to a limited pool of resources that is available for cognitive processing. The test was done to measure vocabulary, depressive behavior, and memory, processing speed. The test results seem to aid positive results overall.

How I Used This: I actually did not get the chance to fit this into my writing. But, I want to try to fit it in as perfectly fits with agenda. I read it thoroughly and believe it would make my writing even better. 

  1. What is Tension and Release in Music?

E, Matt. “What Is Tension and Release in Music? (and How Do You Create It?).” School of Composition, 20 Jan. 2019, http://www.schoolofcomposition.com/what-is-tension-and-release-in-music/. 

Background: The writing explains what is tension and release in music, and why it is used. It gives a better understanding on how to create suspense or dramatics in music.

How I used this: I used this writing to explain the powerful nature of using tension in songs. The closer the notes are in a scale, the more tension they have. More tension tends to make a song more dramatic in emotion.

  1. Musical Key Characteristics & Emotions

H., Jared. “Musical Key Characteristics & Emotions.” LedgerNote, 17 Sept. 2020, ledgernote.com/blog/interesting/musical-key-characteristics-emotions/. 

Background: This explains musical keys and their characteristics. There are 12 Major keys and 12 Minor keys. Each key gives off a specific emotional feel to the listener. Learning the different emotions each key gives helps us better under how an artist can create a story within their musical art. 

How I used this: I used this to help describe the different emotions from the different scales.

  1. Musical Key Characteristics

Musical Key Characteristics, wmich.edu/mus-theo/courses/keys.html. 

Background: This explains musical keys and their characteristics. There are 12 Major keys and 12 Minor keys. Each key gives off a specific emotional feel to the listener. Learning the different emotions each key gives helps us better under how an artist can create a story within their musical art.

How I used this: I used this to help describe the different emotions from the different scales. In particular I used this to explain the C# Minor key.

  1. The Weeknd – Blinding Lights

“The Weeknd – Blinding Lights.” Genius, 29 Nov. 2019, genius.com/The-weeknd-blinding-lights-lyrics. 

Background: In the song Blinding Lights by The Weeknd, we are met with very interesting production choices. It is very inspired by 1980’s styled music with a lot of synth production. The Weeknd sings over this production by stating that he needs his significant other.

How I used it: I used this song as an example to help dissect the emotional feeling of songs. 

  1. Music and Sports – A Psychophysical Effect

Dogra, Shim. MUSIC AND SPORTS – A PSYCHOPHYSICAL EFFECT. Mar. 2017, ijrssis.in/upload_papers/11072017050511112%20sharmila%20Dogra%20133.pdf. 

Background: This article shows the relation between sports and music. It touches on how sporting areas use music to pump up the fans and get them excited, and how people in the gym use music as motivation.

How I used it: I used this article to show the benefits listening to music has for people, even kids. Music can help with concentration, memorization, and improve intelligence.

  1. “Music therapy and neurological rehabilitation: Recognition and the performed body in an ecological niche.”

Aldridge, David. “Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation: Recognition and the Performed Body in an Ecological Niche.” Music Therapy World, 2001, http://www.wfmt.info/Musictherapyworld/modules/mmmagazine/issues/20020321100743/20020321102122/NeurorehabE.pdf. 

Background: In this writing, the writer, David Aldridge, explains why he thinks music therapy is a great thing. From reading, to first hand accounts, David Aldridge realizes the change in people after music therapy. He explains music therapy is repetition and that when you repeat something, the ideas are easier to remember and obtain. A small study was done on children who were delayed on the learning scale, but after music therapy, these kids scored higher on a mini test than they did beforehand. He says, “Music therapy is about these elements; the therapeutic relationship, within a specific hearing/listening environment involving the active performance of sounds using integrated movements, which promote development.” 

How I Used: I did not use this, but I am thinking about adding this.

  1. “The Effects of Music Therapy on Vital Signs, Feeding, and Sleep in Premature Infants”

Loewy, Joanne, et al. “The Effects of Music Therapy on Vital Signs, Feeding, and Sleep in Premature Infants.” American Academy of Pediatrics, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 May 2013, pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/131/5/902.short. 

Background: Music was used to test critical areas such as sucking, weight gain, sleep, and recovery from painful procedures. Parents’ voices were also shown to enhance vocalization in premature infants. During the lullaby and rhythm intervention, lower heart rates occurred. Entrained breath sounds produced lower heart rates and differences in sleep patterns. With parent-preferred lullabies, caloric intake and sucking behavior were higher. Parental stress perception decreased because of music. Music therapy sessions include parental assessment skills, like their own breathing, heartbeat, and voice, and how they help in their infant’s growth. With this in mind, parents should learn to use their bodies as an instrument.

How I used: I did not use, but I want to add this.

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