16 Class MON MAR 25

Classwork

Exercise for Today

Task for Next Week

13 Responses to 16 Class MON MAR 25

  1. g903254 says:

    It’s not a rebuttal if you ask the author for more evidence.
    complaining about the visibility of the evidence is not an effective rebuttal.
    complaining that the evidence doesn’t add up is not an effective rebuttal.
    Saying that the author is unfair towards your position and should cover your position more is not an effective rebuttal.
    Its not an effective rebuttal to say that Herbert uses a “false analogy” when comparing Fukushima to other US nuclear plants.
    It’s not an effective rebuttal to say when Herbert asks us to make a choice on energy futures that it is a “false choice”

  2. nousernamefound1 says:

    It’s not an effective rebuttal to request more evidence from the author. It’s your job to explain if the author shows Irrelevant Evidence, Inconclusive Evidence, Stacking the Deck, False Analogy, or False Choice. Is the price too high? You must answer this question after reading the article. You must know the argument and what side the author is trying to take. Does the author’s plan make sense or worthy to follow? Do the items that the author is looking to compare add up? Many questions have to be answered when doing a Rebuttal argument.

    Take Due 4/01- Rebuttal
    Examples from previous semesters on how to do a good one. You always want to do better than the ones used as an example. This will put you in a great position.

  3. daphneblake25 says:

    -A good rebuttal targets the strongest counter arguments against their presented information and combats it so it won’t hold as much power
    -Telling an author they don’t have enough information or evidence to convince you isn’t a good refute because regardless of the evidence presented, someone could always say it’s not enough information
    -All it takes to overcome insufficient evidence rebuttal is to have strong sufficient evidence of your own
    -if someone was to refute your argument by saying you have irrelevant information, you just need to use that irrelevant information and make it relevant
    -inconclusive evidence never adds up to a proof=logical fallacy
    -saying something is too expensive because it cost more than expected doesn’t make it more expensive could still be. bargain
    -not effective to say, “author really didn’t consider my side of the argument”
    -your point of view could be irrelevant, instead, state your point of view and how the author missed this information which is our deck of cards
    -true analogy is a good way to argue
    -if you can’t find actual evidence that paying people extra money creates more productivity in the gaming industry, you don’t need to prove anything about the gaming industry if money increases productivity in other industries
    -doesn’t work if analogy is false
    -false choice is when the options presented aren’t the only available decisions
    -there may very well be a third choice that the author never reveals
    -it’s not enough to proclaim an argument isn’t good, finding evidence that is better will refute it better

  4. wazoo1234 says:

    Rebuttles cannot be something with a logical fallacy in it.
    Not a good rebuttal when you say author is unfair against your opinions.
    Need actual evidence to make an extremely compelling essay.
    Don’t advance others arguments an do not just use the opposite of the argument for your rebuttle.

  5. chavanillo says:

    Classwork:
    – Rebuttal arguments are arguments that you could prove a person if they are wrong or right. Persuading by having all the answers they might have to believe in what you believe.

    A PRICE TO HIGH:
    – “Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal: WHAT ISN’T: It’s not an effective rebuttal to request more evidence from the author. If the author offers insufficient evidence, or no evidence at all, one good piece of evidence of your own for an opposing point of view can easily refute it.
    WHAT IS: Providing that good evidence is an effective rebuttal.”
    – “Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal:WHAT ISN’T: It’s not an effective rebuttal to complain that you really don’t see what the evidence provided has to do with the argument. If the author offers irrelevant evidence, logic should tell you what the evidence does prove, or could prove.
    WHAT IS: Pointing out that the evidence supports a different conclusion than the author’s is an effective rebuttal.”
    – “Inconclusive Evidence Rebuttal:WHAT ISN’T: It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that the evidence provided doesn’t quite add up to a proof. If the author offers substantial evidence that doesn’t actually support the argument though, as Bob Herbert does in A Price Too High?, you should be able to identify the logical fallacy at fault.”
    “WHAT IS: Demonstrating how a correct interpretation of the evidence proves something other than the author’s argument is an effective rebuttal. In rebuttal of Bob Herbert’s four-paragraph description of cost overruns, for example, you could say: Herbert makes a good case for unanticipated costs of building nuclear power plants, but offers nothing to indicate that the higher costs are unsustainable. Is the electricity generated by nuclear plants more expensive per kilowatt-hour than coal-fired juice? If it is, he should have said so; probably would have said so. If in fact nuclear power is as affordable as traditional electricity, his fretting about cost overruns is a fruitless complaint without real substance.”
    -” Stacking the Deck Rebuttal: WHAT ISN’T: It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that the author is unfair to your “side” of the argument and should offer evidence to support your position. But if the author clearly (but usually stealthily) “stacks the deck” by suppressing evidence, as Rob Herbert does in A Price Too High?, you should be able to call him on it easily.”
    “WHAT IS: You could say, for instance: Bob Herbert acts as if the only benefit we obtain from nuclear power is reduced greenhouse gas emissions. If that were the case, the price might truly be too high. But he neglects to mention nuclear power replaces unsustainable fossil fuels; makes us less dependent on foreign oil imports; eliminates the mercury, sulfur, and countless other emissions from burning coal, and improves our national security by making us less beholden to Middle East dictators.”
    – “False Analogy Rebuttal: TRUE ANALOGY / FALSE ANALOGY Analogy is prediction based on close comparisons. If I’m planning to release The Matrix Revolutions shortly after the outrageous success of The Matrix and The Matrix Reloaded, I point out that the new film shares the same writing and directing team, an almost identical cast, and the same subject matter as the first two films, and should therefore be a huge success too. What one difference made that analogy false? The new actress who played the Oracle? Or the fact that the script was anticlimactic and the audience was already saturated with better material?”
    “WHAT ISN’T: When Bob Herbert compares the nuclear disaster at Fukushima with the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, he emphasizes that they were both almost unimaginable: nobody could have predicted them, he says. He uses that similarity to prove that a similar nuclear catastrophe could happen here. But surely the fact that Fukushima was unpredictable didn’t cause it to occur. It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that Herbert “uses false analogy” when comparing Fukushima to nuclear plants in the US. But it’s a start.”
    “WHAT IS: An effective rebuttal of a false analogy is one that points out the essential difference that keeps the third Matrix from repeating the first two movies, or in this case, the essential difference between Japanese nuclear plants and US plants. If none are positioned as precariously as Fukushima—on massive, active earthquake-prone fault lines just hundreds of feet from the ocean—he’s got no business saying that the failure of one predicts the failure of the other.”

    Is Nuclear Power worth the risk?
    Is not because you don’t know how many people it will effect. Also, Is a lot of money $200 million thats a lot and you don’t even know if income increase because of the dates it will cause to fix.

    Assignment:
    Rebuttal Argument
    -Have a cactus title apart from :Rebuttal Argument.
    – Due march 31 (Sunday)
    – Find a person who strongly disagree your argument
    – To be fair to both side but you are writing to prove the other side is wrong
    – Always put your ideas and authors

  6. nina525 says:

    Definition. causal, rebuttal
    Your writing should refute arguments that are in the back of the readers mind
    Counter arguments
    Confront the strongest argument against your own thesis and refute the opposition
    what are rebuttals, what aren’t rebuttals
    Offering an alternative point of view
    Try to make the counter arguments to your position irrelevant
    For example: Nuclear powerboats too much there for is unaffordable and will cause debt
    alternative: Nuclear power cost more than expected nut only because the amount of power it takes to run it efficiently.
    Create a title when posting
    Rebuttal argument due March 31st
    Find an article or argument and refute their opposition
    Do not consider their argument as an alternative, do not promote the value of the other argument
    Car seats are not safe
    Rebuttal: Car seats are safe because they keep children from being hurt in accidents
    Rebuttal: Car seats are not safe if the quality of the seat is not secure and the child cannot fit I the seat, he or she would be hurt more than they would have if they were not in a car seat.

  7. yourfavoriteanon says:

    Notes:
    – as long as there are wholesome counterarguments, you will need to refute them
    – the reader could always ask for more evidence, so give them more of what they want
    – if they need relative evidence to be convinced then give it to them
    – even if the counterargument is very poor, you have to find a way to refute it

  8. pomegranate4800 says:

    – As long as there are brilliant counter arguments, refute them.
    – If the author provides irrelevant evidence, provide them with relevant evidence.
    – Take irrelevant objection and turn into something relevant.
    – If the evidence is real and strong, but the author draws the wrong conclusion, you should be able to find the right conclusion with the real and strong evidence.
    – A true analogy/ false analogy is an excellent way to argue.
    – The refutation starts with finding the problem and finding a clear explanation out of it.
    – Take a controversial point of view.

  9. hazelnutlatte123 says:

    -must find brilliant counter arguments and refute them
    – do not say the author does not have enough evidence
    – when creating a rebuttal, you must argue, not complain about the effectiveness or amount of evidence shown
    – true analogy: good way to argue
    – can’t find actual evidence that “paying people extra money creates more productivity in gaming industry”…. you don’t need to prove anything about the gaming industry, but can prove the same statement about something similar
    – in a true analogy you can make a similar analogy to give an example
    – if example is not similar, you are creating false analogy
    -take a controversial point of view
    – doesn’t always coincide with common knowledge
    – counterintuitive
    – do not advance position of the writer’s argument

  10. rowanstudent2 says:

    Rebuttals
    – make sure to state anything that can be questioned and answer it in your essay
    – find counterarguments and refute them
    Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal
    – you can provide as much evidence as you want, but if more evidence is requested then it isn’t effective
    – providing good evidence is an effective rebuttal
    Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal
    – it’s not effective to complain that you don’t see what the evidence provided has to do with the argument
    – if the author offer irrelevant evidence, logic should tell you what the evidence does prove or could prove
    – pointing out that the evidence supports a different conclusion than the author’s is effective
    Inconclusive Evidence Rebuttal
    – it’s not effective to say that the evidence provided doesn’t quite add up to a proof
    – you should be able to identify the logical fallacy at fault
    – demonstrating how a correct interpretation of the evidence proves something other than the author’s argument is effective
    Stacking the Deck Rebuttal
    – it’s not effective to say that the author is unfair to your “side” of the argument
    – it’s not an obligation to refute your point of view
    True/False Analogy Rebuttal
    – analogy is prediction based on close comparisons
    – compares events using evidence from previous events similar to them
    False Choice Rebuttal
    – when a false analogy is made, a false choice will follow
    – offering two possibilities out of how many choices
    – an effective rebuttal of a false choice is one that points out the unnamed third choice

    Rebuttal Argument
    – due next Monday
    – identifies and demolishes the argument you feel is the strongest rebuttal to your own thesis
    – be fair on both sides
    – contrary to common knowledge
    – purpose is TO REFUTE, not advance, the strongest rebuttal to your own thesis
    – don’t think the opposite of my thesis
    – your rebuttal is to detail all the qualifications that must be met, taken directly from opponents’ arguments
    – add bibliographic information and links to references

    Editing for Logic
    – rewrite each exercises that the logic is clear
    – replace unnecessary parts

  11. jets1313 says:

    Notes:
    Nuclear rebuttal practice:
    – need sufficient evidence to convince reader
    – not effective to complain how the evidence docent relate to the argument
    – can turn irrelevant objection and turn it it into a relevant objection
    – inconclusive evidence rebuttal:
    – inconclusive is evidence that never adds up to a proof which means there is a logical fallacy
    – stacking the deck rebuttal: the other docent have to consider your point of view, need to produce in essence your stack of cards
    – false choice is often made when a false analogy is made

  12. doorknob9 says:

    -Rebuttals aren’t effective when requesting more evidence from the author. Rebuttals are effective when good evidence is provided.
    -It’s not an effective rebuttal to complain that you really don’t see what the evidence provided has to do with the argument. Pointing out that the evidence supports a different conclusion than the author’s is an effective rebuttal.
    -It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that the evidence provided doesn’t quite add up to a proof. Demonstrating how a correct interpretation of the evidence proves something other than the author’s argument is an effective rebuttal.
    -It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that the author is unfair to your “side” of the argument and should offer evidence to support your position. It is effective when you go on to make points that counters the author.
    -It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that Herbert “uses false analogy” when comparing Fukushima to nuclear plants in the US. An effective rebuttal of a false analogy is one that points out the essential difference that keeps the third Matrix from repeating the first two movies.
    -It’s not an effective rebuttal to say that Herbert “offers a false choice” when asking us to choose energy futures. An effective rebuttal of a false choice is one that points out the unnamed third choice

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