Summaries- honeysucklelilac

1.) There’s No Such Thing As Free Speech

It is counterintuitive that the phrase “free speech”, which is a Constitutional right, actually doesn’t hold much meaning legally. But that free speech is supported when it is applied to justify actions and policies that do follow what societies deem acceptable.

Free speech has lost it’s independent value and has been turned into a political strategy. When it is used surrounding ideas that you believe in, it does nothing but further promote your argument. However, when it is used to advance a position on a topic you do not agree with, it becomes a hinderance.

It becomes an issue of the law when speech crosses the line into action. The significance of the First Amendment is that it makes the distinction that speech is not a type of action and therefore makes it possible to separate speech from consequences. When a court refutes legislation because it defies protected speech, it is not because the speech in question is without consequences but because the consequences have been discounted in relation to a good that is judged to surpass them.

Free speech loses it’s meaning when it is used to argue actions instead of just words. Once speech gets the distinction of being an action it is no longer protected by the First Amendment.

2.) “Humane” Food Lables

It is counterintuitive that humane food labels on packaged animal products, doesn’t always guarantee that the animals are treated better than the ones without the distinctive label. The conditions aren’t better for the animals and the profit is better for the people.

The only label that is supported by legally enforceable guidelines is organic and even that one has loopholes. An example being that chickens have access to outdoor space but not requiring that the birds actually spend any time outside. Other labels such as all-natural, sustainable and cage free can be justified however the food producer sees fit.

There needs to be an understanding that there are both independent and industry-produced quality assurance programs circulating under the name “humane”. These programs have no type of audit, which allows them to have little input from the public and instead use experts on animal production. This completely eliminates taking into account the animals well fare.

Organic and sustainable farming practices are better for the environment, and many can lead to a better quality of life for animals. In terms of animal welfare, the Certified Humane label and the Animal Welfare Approved are while administered by third parties and not the government.

All of this considered, it is worth looking into what the labels and brands you are buying are actually doing for the animals. Being an informed consumer is the best option when placing importance on the labels of the food you eat.

(Additional source: What Meat Like “Organic” and “Grass-Fed” Actually Mean- And Whether You Should Care. Certified Humane by Moria Lawler)

3.) Men Define Rape

It is counterintuitive that men decide what the conditions are to defining when a woman is raped by a man. History proves that the women’s opinions, thoughts and feelings are not taken into any sort of consideration.

One of the first sets of law written, The Code of Hammurabi in about 1780 BC defines rape of a virgin as property damage against her father. The father would be compensated and the woman was deemed an adulteress. Even the Latin root of the word rape, raptus referred to the abduction of a women against the will of the man that controlled her.

It wasn’t until January of 2012 that the FBI’s definition of forcible rape. The new definition includes other forms of sexual assault, other genders, and instances where the “victim is incapable of giving consent because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity, including due to the influence of drugs or alcohol or because of age.”

The battle for women who are victims of rape and sexual assault continues everyday. The world has been and continues to be male dominated in positions of power and the law for so long it is difficult for history to not repeat itself.

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2 Responses to Summaries- honeysucklelilac

  1. davidbdale says:

    These are really good, Lilac. They start and stay focused. They marshal details well to support a single thesis. And they’re well written. I’m impressed.

    Shall we take a closer look at just one?

    It is counterintuitive that humane food labels on packaged animal products, doesn’t always guarantee that the animals are treated better than the ones without the distinctive label.

    While I CAN FIGURE OUT exactly what you mean, your language does put obstacles in the way.
    —The labels are plural, but you make them the subject of a singular verb “doesn’t.” You should be saying that the labels DON”T guarantee humane treatment.
    —You also seem to confuse what gets labeled. The second half of your sentence actually says that the “animals are not treated better that the ANIMALS without the distinctive label. Obviously youy don’t mean that.

    The conditions aren’t better for the animals and the profit is better for the people.

    Rhetorically, comparisons work better when they compare equal items.
    —Example, two positive verbs: The conditions ARE WORSE for the animals while the profits ARE BETTER for the food producers
    —Example, mixed verbs with a contrasting transition (even if): The profits for the producers are better EVEN IF the conditions for the animals are not.

    An example being that chickens have access to outdoor space but not requiring that the birds actually spend any time outside.

    You’re mixing your verbs again.
    —For example, chickens MUST HAVE access to outdoor space EVEN IF they never actually spend time outdoors.
    —For example, chicken farmers MUST PROVIDE access to outdoor space, but ARE NOT REQUIRED TO SHOW that the birds spend any time outside.

    There needs to be an understanding

    I assume this means that READERS NEED TO UNDERSTAND. Frankly, there’s no need to insist. You could simply say:

    Most importantly, both independent and industry-produced quality assurance programs circulate under the name “humane.”

    Notice the period AS ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, belongs inside the quotation mark

    These programs have no type of audit, which allows them to have little input from the public and instead use experts on animal production. This completely eliminates taking into account the animals well fare.

    Eliminate as many “These and This” beginnings as possible. They such the energy from sentences.

    —Revised without the pronouns: “Most importantly, both independent and industry-produced quality assurance programs circulate unaudited under the name “humane,” which allows them to ESCAPE public input and instead RELY on HIRED animal production FOR COMPLIANCE. In other words, label or not, animal welfare depends on the farmer.”

    In terms of animal welfare, the Certified Humane label and the Animal Welfare Approved are while administered by third parties and not the government.

    —Not sure what that means. Something’s goes wrong at about “are while administered.”

    All of this considered, it is worth looking into what the labels and brands you are buying are actually doing for the animals. Being an informed consumer is the best option when placing importance on the labels of the food you eat.

    —These could and probably should be combined into a single sentence.

    Overall very nice work, as I suggested, Lilac. (But every draft can be improved.)

    Like

  2. davidbdale says:

    I’ve graded your assignment at Canvas, Lilac. If you’re satisfied with the grade, do nothing. If you’d like to revise for a better grade, make significant improvements to all three examples and place this post into the Regrade Please category.

    Whichever you choose, responding to your professor’s feedback is not only polite, it’s the best way to assure that he continues to take an interest in your development as a writer. Any response is good. “Thanks, professor,” and “I have further questions,” and “What the hell was that!” are popular choices.

    If you’d prefer to be ignored, leave no response at all. 🙂

    Like

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