Safer Saws- Icedcoffeeislife

  • Manufacturers (Steve Gass, Bosch, others):
  • “SawStop still makes the only saws with skin-sensing technology, and accounts for a tiny fraction of total saw sales. Tens of thousands of digits have been sliced off in the past decade, but the rest of the power tool industry has snubbed the technology and carried on as before.” This is an example of comparative claim because it is stating how Sawstop technology works and how it is different from other types of table saws. This shows what Sawstop technology looks like compared to Bosch technology for their saw. 
  • Customers:
  • “The invention of the SawStop technology, power-tool makers could argue that table saws were just an inherently dangerous product, and customers accepted the risk when they chose to buy and operate them. But now that technology like SawStop exists, plaintiffs have begun to argue that the absence of the technology constitutes a dangerous design defect.” This is a categorical claim because it is listing the saw that the sawstop technology can help a person who is looking into buying one of their saws. 
  • Industry Spokespeople:
  • “When Bosch chose to introduce the Reaxx saw in disregard of our patents, they left us with no alternative but to take action in court. We have defended our innovation, our hard work, and our investments in developing SawStop technology, and we are pleased that the ITC ordered the exclusion of products that use our patented inventions without a license and confirmed the strength of those patents”. This is an example of Evaluated Claim because Glass is speaking out on how Reaxx saw and how it was copying the idea of the safesaws, he put into question the motives of why the Reaxx saw was made. 
  • Consumer Safety Advocates:
  • “Ten people every day – according to the CPSC’s own data – have their fingers amputated in power saw accidents. 10 a day!  I’ve wanted to push the CPSC for a mandatory standard ever since hearing a story on NPR in May of 2006.” This is a factual claim because it is explaining a  situation with how many people that are being injured with saws and how with the safe saw technology that the number of finger amputations can be lowered. 
  • Injured Plaintiffs:
  • “In 2015, 4,700 people in the US lost a finger or other body part to table-saw incidents. Most of those injuries didn’t have to happen, thanks to technology invented in 1999 by entrepreneur Stephen Gass.” This is an example of factual claim because it is stating the number of people that were injured by a table-saw, but with the new technology from Gass it has helped lower that number. 
  • Personal Injury Lawyers:
  •  “Each year, more than 67,000 workers and do-it-yourselfers are injured by table saws, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (PDF), resulting in more than 33,000 emergency room visits and 4,000 amputations. At an average cost of $35,000 each, these accidents lead to more than $2.3 billion in societal costs annually including medical bills, lost wages, and pain and suffering.” This is an example of a factual claim because it is stating the amount of people that get injured by table saws each year and how much the injuries will cost to fix and try and get the person’s hand back to normal. 
  • Government Officials:
  • “The US International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled in favor of SawStop and effectively halted Bosch from “importing, selling, marketing, advertising, distributing (except for exportation), and soliciting United States agents or distributors for imported table saws.”  This is an evaluative claim because it is stating why there is a halt on when Bosch can modify their table saws due to the court ruling in favor of sawstop.
  • News Reporters:
  • “Sure enough, the blade came to a dead stop in about three one-thousandths of a second, leaving the dog with only a minor nick.” This is an evaluative claim because it is showing how fast the blade will stop if it senses a finger near the blade. 

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