White Paper – iwantpopsicle

Hypothesis: Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder are not dangerous, but are in need of special help and psychiatric care and shouldn’t be stigmatized by the public and healthcare professionals. 

Source 1: 

Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability in affect regulation, impulse control, interpersonal relationships, and self-image. The cause of this personality disorder is only somewhat known currently, but it seems to stem from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse as a child. About 1-2% of the general population is affected by this disorder, and about 10% of people with BPD commit suicide. This is a very high number of people considering how that number relates to the total number of individuals that have it. Individuals with BPD require significantly more mental health resources than those with other common mental health disorders, because BPD causes severe psychosocial impairment and makes it hard to live a normal, functioning life. 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.625.4235&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Source 2:

The Lifetime Course of Borderline Personality Disorder

When people with BPD are not seen in a formal mental health treatment setting, they are often seen when in times of crisis. This leads people to believe that those with BPD are constantly in crisis and are never recovering. The truth is that while those with BPD do suffer intensely a lot of the time, their condition is proven to improve over time with proper treatment. BPD can be effectively treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Being that BPD stems from childhood trauma, it can be reliably and validly diagnosed in adolescence. Risk factors for developing BPD in adolescents include maternal-child discord, maternal BPD, and depression. In a 10 year study of 668 patients, researchers found that the patients had improved with their condition over the 10 year period while being treated. 

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/070674371506000702

Source 3:

Effectiveness of Partial Hospitalization in the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Researchers took 38 patients that were diagnosed with BPD and placed them into two different groups. One group received partially hospitalized care, while the other group received standard psychiatric care. The measures that they were looking for included frequency of suicide attempts and self harm, inpatient visits and their duration, depressive symptoms, anxiety, interpersonal function, and social function. At the end of the study, they found that psychoanalytically focused partial hospitalized treatment was significantly more effective than standard psychiatric care. Patients in the partially hospitalized group showed significantly less frequent self harm, and much improved depressive symptoms.

https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/ajp.156.10.1563

Source 4:

The Stigma of Personality Disorders

Borderline Personality Disorder is shown to be the most stigmatized mental disorder, and also has the most research related to its stigma. Individuals with mental illness are viewed to be at fault for their mental illness, and it is portrayed that they somehow choose to exhibit these symptoms. Despite efforts to combat this stigma, research shows that the situation has not improved over time, and people still continue to stigmatize the mentally ill. Some of those with personality disorders are afraid to seek treatment for their mental illness in order to avoid being labelled as “crazy”. This creates a very hard life for those who are struggling, as they are afraid to even get help in the first place. Those with BPD are shown to “self-stigmatize” and view themselves as insane, or unhelpable. This causes them to have great shame in their disorder and for their lives in general. Research shows that some psychiatrists may avoid telling their patient that they have BPD, in order to help them avoid stigmatization from the system.

Source 5:

Why go to the emergency department? Perspectives from persons with borderline personality disorder

Those with BPD are treated differently by healthcare professionals due to their diagnosis. Sulzer (2015) found that healthcare providers describe patients with BPD as “difficult” and a “pain in the ass”. They will stigmatize patients for the very behaviors that they are trying to correct, such as manipulative, attention seeking, and suicidal tendencies. These things are outside of the patient’s control, and they wouldn’t be in the doctor’s office if they could help it on their own. Those with BPD have a very limited ability to cope with intense emotions, and this can make them hard to treat. When they are blamed for these behaviors, it perpetuates the stereotype that those with BPD are just attention seekers and choose to act the way that they do. BPD is characterized with feelings of intense loneliness and fear of abandonment, so when healthcare providers make this worse by giving sufferers less than adequate service, it just exacerbates these awful feelings.

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8 Responses to White Paper – iwantpopsicle

  1. davidbdale says:

    I cannot make any numerical sense of this claim from your Source 1.

    This is a very high number of people considering how that number relates to the total number of individuals that have it.

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  2. davidbdale says:

    This is clever:

    When people with BPD are not seen in a formal mental health treatment setting, they are often seen when in times of crisis. This leads people to believe that those with BPD are constantly in crisis and are never recovering.

    Like

  3. davidbdale says:

    I’m counting on you to provide me with an accurate Purposeful Summary, Pop, so can you clarify this claim for me? You make it sound as if some researchers had patients at their disposal and DECIDED TO TREAT half of them one way, half of them the other way. Did they really have the power to SET UP that experiment? Or did they, more likely, analyze the treatment patterns and resulting conditions of 38 patients SOMEBODY ELSE was treating? If so, HOW THEY SELECTED their test group is an essential question.

    Researchers took 38 patients that were diagnosed with BPD and placed them into two different groups. One group received partially hospitalized care, while the other group received standard psychiatric care.

    You and I could probably find a group of 38 that delivered very different statistical outcomes.

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  4. davidbdale says:

    Reading your Source 4, I couldn’t help asking myself, “Why hasn’t Pop begun to describe BPD in a way that I can understand the symptoms, the behaviors it causes, the hidden mental conditions that comprise this illness?” I haven’t seen that explanation in anything you’ve shared so far, probably because you know the answer and don’t need your White Paper to explain it to you. Fair enough. How does your understanding compare with this one I found by searching:

    Borderline personality disorder is a mental health disorder that impacts the way you think and feel about yourself and others, causing problems functioning in everyday life. It includes self-image issues, difficulty managing emotions and behavior, and a pattern of unstable relationships.

    It doesn’t really help me much, and it’s SSOOOOO vague that I get the impression it’s a GO-TO diagnosis when practitioners can’t think of something more specific to declare.

    Your reaction, please?

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    • In my essay, I will be sure to go into much more detail describing how people with BPD show symptoms and how exactly it effects their day to day life. The definition I put here generally is the vague definition that you could find by doing a simple search online.

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  5. davidbdale says:

    SOURCE 5!!!! Here’s a worthy place to begin. A visit to the emergency room that results in stigmatization is the perfect anecdotal opening to your Causal Argument, when you get there. Why is BPD so hard to treat, and why do so few sufferers get the treatment they need to keep them from self-harm? Partial answer: When they seek treatment, from the very people most in a position to provide it, they’re considered attention-seeking pains in the ass.

    Yeah. Concentrate on that aspect.

    Keep this conversation going, Pop. Reply to all or some of the Replies here. I want to see your avatar in the Recent Comments section of the sidebar.

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    • This is one of the main aspects that I want to focus on in my essay. I want to highlight the fact that people suffering from the illness are often in such great emotional pain that they need help, and the help that they receive can be very much less than adequate due to stigmatization of the illness.

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  6. davidbdale says:

    You need a Current State of the Research section, Pop, to help me understand what direction you’re heading. Maybe an alternative Hypothesis too, to keep your options open and your eyes on the lookout.

    When you say, “shouldn’t be stigmatized by the public and healthcare professionals,” you’re making an Ethical Claim, which is admirable. But what is the result of such a claim? Can it amount to anything other than, “Stop being so judgmental!”?

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