Rebuttal-Hailthegreat8

Authoritarian parents can help

Authoritarian parents are described as stern and the plain appositive of an alternative parent. Those parents are supposed to have so many rules, and they ignore their child’s feelings and don’t care about their opinion. It may sound horrible to people hearing about this for the first time in their life, but this type of teaching can create an influential, successful, wealthy person in the community. Most of the children that grew up with this style end up being doctors, lawyers, politicians, and more, so there are positive aspects. “But often, this comes at a cost,” stated Jeff Nalin. He said, “children whose behavior is largely dependent on a strict regimen of dos and don’ts will base their own self-worth on whether or not they have obeyed the rules put into place by their parents.” cause you might get punished.

Many individuals worldwide have grown up with Authoritarian parents, and many people say that type of parental style can mess up your life; teaching your child this way can lead to depression, social anxiety, and more. Growing up with this type of parenting, you will resent them when you’re older; you’ll hate them for not listening to you or helping you emotionally throughout your childhood, but having Authoritarian parents can you help you a lot throughout your childhood and prepare for the harsh relate of being an adult. Authoritarian parents can help you. Succeed in the field you’re going after; they will push you to be your better self.

One of the positive aspects of having Authoritarian parents is that your child knows good behavior. “They are also highly attuned to the negative consequences that can stem from wrong behavior, so they will avoid stepping out of line.” Having good behavior has a chance of making many good habits that positively affect your life. Good behavior will help your child make routines. For example, every day you wake up, you clean your room, make your bed, and do your homework; also, your child will respect other individuals when they’re talking to them. Your child’s positive behavior continues to show can affect everyone around them, and that’s a good thing. Another good reason for having an Authoritarian parent is the want to do the right thing. “The authoritarian style of parenting will encourage a child to think about their behavior, before doing it. This means the child has a desire to do right and will be better at thinking through their actions before making a choice to do it”. This can make your child bolder in the future and help with their decision throughout their life.

Safety is another positive trait when learning from an Authoritarian Parent; I mean, they would try to minimize danger in your life. The threat you might face throughout your childhood. Authoritarian Parents plan out a promising future for you, find a career where you will succeed, and teach you everything in that field to be one of the best when you join the working class. Another positive trait that an Authoritarian Parent leads is fighting for the goal, future. ” Children raised by authoritarian parents adhere to detailed plans that include precise instructions”. Teaching this to their kids helps them grasp what steps they need to take throughout their lives to reach their destination.

I know that the Authoritarian parent’s style has many significant aspects that can help your child, but some adverse effects damage your child mentally and physically. For a child to have a genuinely productive childhood and prepare them for the outside world, more than one parenting style is better. I believe combining Authoritarian parent’s style and Authoritative parents will balance your child out and bring most satisfaction on both ends. Authoritative parents talk to their children. It’s like a “give-and-take” scenario with rules that can be adjusted. If your child breaks the rule, don’t punish straight away; explain to them what they did was wrong and show them want to do. You should help your child with their decision so that they can become wiser. Authoritarian parents and Authoritative parents both want a level of control over their child’s behavior/activities. Authoritarian parents believe they are always right and never wrong, but Authoritative parents know they make mistakes and correct themselves. Authoritarian parents shouldn’t “exert psychological control.” If they do this, their child will fight them; it can become a toxic environment, and your child can end up resenting you hating you for their rest of life, and no parents want that.

If a parent can combine these two teaching styles into their child, the environment will be better, less fighting, decrease depression, anxiety, help their self-esteem. They will build a stronger connection, and that’s what parents want with their child a bond. When your child is in trouble, he mostly likes to come to you for help/advice than anyone else because you connect with them and are willing to listen and not only punish them; don’t pick one type of parenting style; you have to balance them out. As Kenda Cheery stated, “Try not to be too harsh nor too lenient; you can start by letting your child make more decisions, but also have regular discussions about those choices. With time, attention, and flexibility to your child’s needs”. Both these parenting styles have positive and negative effects, and your choice as parents to either pick one of them or combine them for your child., but remember you aren’t doing this for yourself; you’re doing it for your child. Have their best interest in mind when implementing your parenting style.

References

Christin Perry December 06, and Christin Perry. “Authoritarian Parenting: The Pros and Cons, According to a Child Psychologist.” Parents, 6 Dec. 2019, www.parents.com/parenting/better-parenting/style/authoritarian-parenting-the-pros-and-cons-according-to-a-child-psychologist/

Stephney, Shonette. The Effects of Rewarding Positive Behavior in Children, Ministry of Education, Guyana, 2 Nov. 2015, www.education.gov.gy/web/index.php/parenting-tips/item/1785-the-effects-of-rewarding-positive-behavior-in-children

“The Pros and Cons of Authoritarian Parenting.” Blessed Learners, 20 Sept. 2018, www.blessedlearners.com/pros-and-cons-of-authoritarian-parenting/

Li, Author Pamela. “Authoritative vs Authoritarian Parenting Styles [Infographic].” Parenting For Brain, 29 Oct. 2020, www.parentingforbrain.com/authoritative-vs-authoritarian-parenting/

Cherry, Kendra. “Do You Have an Authoritative Parenting Style?” Verywell Mind, 17 Sept. 2020, www.verywellmind.com/what-is-authoritative-parenting-2794956

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8 Responses to Rebuttal-Hailthegreat8

  1. davidbdale says:

    Your first paragraph is sabotaged by an unclear antecedent and the failure to NAME and DISTINGUISH two types of parenting. At the end of the paragraph, we only THINK we know which style you’re describing, AND we’re not sure whether you applaud or deride it because of your own stated ambivalence and the 50/50 nature of the source you cite.

    Authoritarian parents are described as stern and the plain appositive of an alternative parent.

    You cannot assume that the reader of THIS essay has read your others, Great8. If this is our introduction to your world, we don’t know whether a capital-A Alternative parent is a parent type like a capital-A Authoritarian parent. We don’t even know if you’re capitalizing Authoritarian as a type or because the word starts your sentence. You might mean “Parents with an stern, authoritarian style are described as the opposite of all other alternatives.”

    Those parents are supposed to have so many rules, and they ignore their child’s feelings and don’t care about their opinion.

    As a result of our confusion about your terminology, we don’t know who you mean by THOSE parents.

    It may sound horrible to people hearing about THIS for the first time in their life, but THIS type of teaching can create an influential, successful, wealthy person in the community.

    There’s no clear antecedent for THIS or THIS, so we’re understandably confused. Are you defining Authoritarian parenting as rule-heavy, insensitive, horrible, and VERY successful? Have you pivoted that fast from condemning horrible behavior to admiring it?

    Most of the children that grew up with THIS style end up being doctors, lawyers, politicians, and more, so there are positive aspects. “But often, THIS comes at a cost,” stated Jeff Nalin.

    Your explanation still has no clear antecedent, and Nalin’s quote doesn’t help. We assume he means whatever you mean by THIS, but he COULD MEAN that being a professional comes at a cost.

    He said, “children whose behavior is largely dependent on a strict regimen of dos and don’ts will base their own self-worth on whether or not they have obeyed the rules put into place by their parents.”

    That’s a good quote. The first to connect strict regimen to an imperiled sense of self-worth.

    cause you might get punished.

    If I allow the fragment, you’ll still need to use a capital. And if you’re going to use the slang—’cause—you’ll need an apostrophe to indicate the missing letters.

    So remember, this opening paragraph introduces a new standalone argument that requires you to orient your readers to the terminology. Very briefly.

  2. davidbdale says:

    Multiple violations of the Fails For Grammar Rule 12. Search ALL your arguments for the 2nd person and purge it.

    Many individuals worldwide have grown up with Authoritarian parents, and many people say that type of parental style can mess up YOUR life; teaching YOUR child this way can lead to depression, social anxiety, and more. Growing up with this type of parenting, YOU will resent them when YOU’RE older; YOU’LL hate them for not listening to YOU or helping YOU emotionally throughout YOUR childhood, but having Authoritarian parents can YOU help YOU a lot throughout YOUR childhood and prepare for the harsh relate of being an adult. Authoritarian parents can help YOU. Succeed in the field YOU’RE going after; they will push YOU to be YOUR better self.

  3. davidbdale says:

    Hmmm . . . you hide a premise in your refutation of the argument in Paragraph 2, Great8.

    Succeed in the field you’re going after; they will push you to be your better self.

    If I understand the Authoritarian parent as you have described her to me, SHE decides what field you’re going after and pushes you to become HER VERSION of your better self.

    (There might be 10 more 2nd person pronouns to purge from this paragraph too).

  4. davidbdale says:

    What you say in paragraph 3 makes sense, Great8. But the problem with vague social hypotheses like “Authoritarian parenting creates more thoughtful children” is that the opposite conclusion can so easily ALSO be defended. You say being taught to think about actions and their consequences is a good thing. I’ll grant you that, if you grant me that worrying about making the choice your parent would want you to make regardless of the consequences is a bad thing. Where do we get with this kind of “evidence”?

  5. davidbdale says:

    You say

    Authoritarian Parents plan out a promising future for you, find a career where you will succeed, and teach you everything in that field to be one of the best when you join the working class.

    And I say

    My authoritarian dad concluded the only way for his mediocre son to get a good engineering education was through the military, so he made me enlist and sent me to a warzone to get killed.

    We could both be right. And that’s, again, the trouble with these “common sense” hypotheses. They’re VERY hard to quantify and conclusively demonstrate. Can you find some scholarly studies that have verifiable results? They would help on BOTH sides of the argument. Studies that prove the efficacy of Authoritarian parenting, and strong evidence from a Worthy Opponent you can refute.

  6. davidbdale says:

    The great danger of using 2nd-person language in our academic arguments is that it leads too easily to preaching at our readers. OUR READERS ARE NOT PAYING FOR A SERMON. We are in the business of making strong arguments that guide our readers to draw the wise conclusions our evidence supports. We let them DECIDE we are right. We don’t tell them how to live:

    If your child breaks the rule, don’t punish straight away; explain to them what they did was wrong and show them want to do. You should help your child with their decision so that they can become wiser.

  7. davidbdale says:

    Kenda Cheery is a blogger whose JOB is to tell readers how to live. Her opinions are not evidence. And our job as academic writers is very different from hers.

    If your child breaks the rule, don’t punish straight away; explain to them what they did was wrong and show them want to do. You should help your child with their decision so that they can become wiser.

    Perfectly appropriate for the VeryWellMind blog. Not persuasive in your academic paper.

  8. davidbdale says:

    You asked me to review your citation work, Great8. I found a problem with the first one, in your Introduction. It mentions Jeff Nalin without identifying where Nalin’s quote comes from. I don’t see any reference to Jeff Nalin in your References list, so I have no idea which source you’re drawing from for the quote.

    The same thing happens twice in Paragraph 3. I have no idea where you’re pulling your quotes.

    You do mention Kenda Cheery in your final citation. It’s the closest you come to a completely compliant citation technique.

    Be sure to read this post before we talk this afternoon:
    https://rucomp2.com/about/apa-citation/

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