Visual Rhetoric- runnerd4

PROFESSOR NOTE: 
Thank you, Runner, for posting early.
Classmates, please read both Runner’s thoughtful analysis AND your Professor’s Reply to the First Five Seconds before posting your own version.

0:00-0:05

In the first five seconds of this video, we see a man (Keenan Allen) and little girl who I suppose is his daughter. He is spinning around his daughter in the air. The little girl is in a yellow shirt with light blue/grey pants. The man is in a white tee shirt and blue jeans. They are both smiling. I think the creator included this in the video to appeal to pathos. The happiness between the father and daughter adds to whatever argument they are trying to make. I am also thinking that they used Keenan Allen as a way to appeal to ethos through celebrity endorsement.

0:06-0:10

The frame switches to the same man and his son. The son is wearing a navy blue shirt and a pair of khaki shorts. The son is very young, maybe about a year old. They are also dancing together like the man was doing with his daughter. The father is holding his son and dancing around with him. The man is smiling and the son also seems to be pretty content and making happy baby faces. I think the creator included this also to appeal to pathos. The happiness adds to the argument (fatherhood involvement).

0:11-0:13

In this moment, it shows Keenan playing the piano. For his kids? He seems to be a good piano player based on how smoothly his fingers are moving on the keys. I could be wrong though because I have the video muted.

0:14-0:16

The next frame shows Keenan playing for his kids so they can have their own little band. There seems to be another 2 people in the frame to the right, but I cannot figure out who, maybe another daughter and his wife. His daughter is playing on her little drum set. This little scene displays the idea of fatherhood involvement because he is part of their little band, a key part too. This scene is very wholesome and would make the audience smile, appealing to pathos.

0:17-0:19

This frame shows the inner workings of the piano. I believe that the creator used this to compare the beauty and intricacy of how the piano works to the beauty and intricacy of the family working together as one. All of the piano works together to make the beautiful sounds while all of the family comes together to create a beautiful relationship.

0:20-0:26

The daughter and the man were dancing while the film director’s clapperboard comes in to end the film. I think that this whole piece mainly used ethos and pathos to get their point across. They used celebrity endorsement. The celebrity endorsement shows that if even a man so busy could have an active involvement in their children’s lives, so can you. The pathos is from the joy from the interaction of Keenan and his children.

0:27-0:38

The last seconds of the video add to the message that men should be involved in their children’s lives. It displayed in white letters on a black screen “Make a Moment” and “#DanceLikeADad”. It also included a website for more information. These last slides concluded the piece.

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1 Response to Visual Rhetoric- runnerd4

  1. davidbdale says:

    This is a good start, Runner. You’ve captured and shared a lot of good information about what you saw in the video. The primary rewrite exercise now will be to share all the inferences and conclusions that occurred to you, or might occur to your reader if your reader could watch the video. For example, in the first five seconds.

    0:00-0:05
    In the first five seconds of this video, we see a man (Keenan Allen) and little girl who I suppose is his daughter.

    We know he’s Keenan Allen, and also that he’s a wide receiver for the Los Angeles Chargers, because an on-screen caption identifies him and his job. We assume the girl is his daughter only because he is spinning her over his head in the way a father might spin his daughter. She could be a niece. Or she could be a child cast to play the part of his relative. I say “cast” because this video was clearly produced in a studio somewhere, shot against a white wall or screen that eliminates any background interference. Perhaps a background will be provided later as part of an advertising campaign. Either way, the action has probably been captured by professional videographer, maybe for television, for an ad, or maybe for Keenan’s personal use.

    He is spinning around his daughter in the air.

    He’s an NFL wide receiver spinning a little girl in the air much the way an NFL receiver might spin to catch and control a football above his head. We don’t worry about this girl’s safety because she’s “in good hands.” Unless Keenan Allen has a reputation for dropping passes. Does he? If so, this shot has very different connotations.

    The little girl is in a yellow shirt with light blue/grey pants. The man is in a white tee shirt and blue jeans.

    The little girl is casually dressed (or has been costumed to look casual). Keenan is casual in the extreme—saggy faded jeans and a stretched-out white tee. Either this is exactly the look the director wanted, or she would have insisted he wear something else. We actually worry a bit that, as he spins, the phone might slip out of his back pocket and hit the floor. The girl seems safe. The phone looks precarious. As the camera angle changes, a big boom mic appears in the frame above the characters’ heads. Obviously, capturing the sounds of this fun time between dad and daughter is important. The girl’s mouth is open the whole time, so she is probably shrieking or squealing with delight.

    They are both smiling. I think the creator included this in the video to appeal to pathos. The happiness between the father and daughter adds to whatever argument they are trying to make.

    It’s certainly not uncommon for a dad to spin his daughter overhead, but it’s an important moment of physical fun to capture on film to, as you say, make the claim that they get along and enjoy their time together.

    I am also thinking that they used Keenan Allen as a way to appeal to ethos through celebrity endorsement.

    They may also have specifically chosen a professional athlete since we do not automatically characterize football players as doting and affectionate dads who will dance in public to amuse their kids.

    Much of what I’ve offered here could be way off base, but it represents the sort of judgments we make (sometimes consciously but often subliminally) when we watch a video. Directors can’t control EVERYTHING we think, but they do their best to limit the number of possible interpretations and guide us to those that serve the argument best.

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