Claims – BabyGoat

“Brannan sent Katie to the school therapist, once. She hasn’t seen any other therapist, or a therapist trained to deal with PTSD—Brannan knows what a difference that makes, since the volunteer therapist she tried briefly herself spent more time asking her to explain a “bad PTSD day” than how Caleb’s symptoms were affecting the family. When I visited, Katie was not covered by the VA under Caleb’s disability; actually, she wasn’t covered by any insurance at all half the time, since the Vineses aren’t poor enough for subsidized health care and the Blue Cross gap insurance maxes out at six months a year. She’s never been diagnosed with anything, and Brannan prefers it that way. “I’m not for taking her somewhere and getting her labeled. I’d rather work on it in softer ways,” like lots of talks about coping skills, and an art class where she can express her feelings, “until we have to. And I’m hoping we won’t have to.” Certainly she seems better than some other PTSD vets’ kids Brannan knows, who scream and sob and rock back and forth at the sound of a single loud noise, or who try to commit suicide even before they’re out of middle school. Caleb spends enough time worrying that he’s messing up his kid without a doctor saying so.”

“Brannan sent Katie to the school therapist, once. She hasn’t seen any other therapist, or a therapist trained to deal with PTSD—Brannan knows what a difference that makes, since the volunteer therapist she tried briefly herself spent more time asking her to explain a “bad PTSD day” than how Caleb’s symptoms were affecting the family.”

This an Evaluation Claim because due to self experience, Brennan knows that a proper PTSD therapist will help her daughter way more efficiently than a therapist with no skills on that topic.

“When I visited, Katie was not covered by the VA under Caleb’s disability; actually, she wasn’t covered by any insurance at all half the time, since the Vineses aren’t poor enough for subsidized health care and the Blue Cross gap insurance maxes out at six months a year.”

This is a Factual Claim because these events actually happened, and due to insurance policy, it would be correct for the max our period.

“She’s never been diagnosed with anything, and Brannan prefers it that way. ‘I’m not for taking her somewhere and getting her labeled. I’d rather work on it in softer ways,’ like lots of talks about coping skills, and an art class where she can express her feelings, ‘until we have to. And I’m hoping we won’t have to.”’

These sentences show a Casual Claim as Brennan explains that if she does go to a professional, then her daughter will be diagnosed with something, “labeled.”

This also shows an Evaluation Claim as Brennan would have had to thought about her decisions and opinions.

“Certainly she seems better than some other PTSD vets’ kids Brannan knows, who scream and sob and rock back and forth at the sound of a single loud noise, or who try to commit suicide even before they’re out of middle school.”

This a sign of Categorial Claim as she groups the signs of “worse” kids.

This is also Comparative as she uses the effects to basically say her daughter doesn’t do these things.

“Caleb spends enough time worrying that he’s messing up his kid without a doctor saying so.”

Casual Claim as Caleb thinks that his problems are messing up his kid’s life.

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