Strong Opening: Nina

  • While patients with clinical depression or other mental disorders cannot be expected to make a rational request for assisted euthanization , individuals including children suffering from terminal diseases with no known cure are offered the option to be euthanized by a doctor. Does this mean doctors get to decide who’s life is worth living? Does a child have the understanding of euthanasia to make the choice for themselves? Should parents allow their children or a loved one to suffer from a disease as such?
  • When we were younger, we were told we couldn’t make big decisions because we were too young to understand whats right and the consequences of what we choose. But what if children are older than adults? Age does not determine when someone is an adult, so age should not determine who should make decisions. For example, if a six year old boy only has eight months to live, and a twenty five year old who is healthy and has no health risks will live for years, who is really the older person in this situation. In cases involving the option of euthanasia in children, many argue that children a too young to decide if they can no longer live from an incurable disease, but in this case death determines age.

 

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5 Responses to Strong Opening: Nina

  1. davidbdale says:

    Opening 1.

    The trouble with Rhetorical Questions, Nina, is that they invite your readers to come up with the wrong answers. Once you prompt them to craft their own claims in their minds, the job of talking them out of their own opinions is twice as hard. Don’t give them the chance to refute you before you even start to lay out your own claims and evidence.

    While patients with clinical depression or other mental disorders cannot be expected to make a rational request for assisted euthanization, individuals including children suffering from terminal diseases with no known cure are offered the option to be euthanized by a doctor.

    You packed a lot into that sentence, Nina, but you appear to be trying to contrast two groups: Terminally ill people with mental disorders and Terminally ill people without mental disorders. But your real goal is to contrast the mentally ill with children. That might be harder to do in one sentence. You’re balancing two types of real or suspected “inability to make a mature, informed, rational decision.”

    Does this mean doctors get to decide who’s life is worth living?

    No, I answer, reflexively. It means they get to judge who does or does not have the ability to make the informed decision. If you think it DOES mean they “get to decide,” you’ve just made your job harder.

    Does a child have the understanding of euthanasia to make the choice for themselves?

    No matter how I answer this one, you haven’t advanced your own argument by asking it. Your hypothesis is a theory you want to test, and these are questions you want to ask yourself, but you DO NOT want to ask your readers. Decide, then tell them what you can prove.

    Should parents allow their children or a loved one to suffer from a disease as such?

    You’ve now asked several TYPES of questions, none Causal.
    —Are children and mentally ill adults intellectually similar? [DEFINITION CATEGORICAL]
    —Are doctors the deciders? [DEFINITION CATEGORICAL]
    —Can a child make the informed decision? [DEFINITION CATEGORICAL]
    —Should parents let their children suffer? [ETHICAL]
    —Are doctors the deciders? [DEFINITION CATEGORICAL]

    Does this help you adapt your strategy for a Strong Opening, Nina?

  2. nina525 says:

    I wanted to mention that I wanted to somewhat change my hypothesis so that I strictly focus on age and depression when discussing euthanasia, no longer focusing on terminal illnesses. I’ve noticed in my research that a lot of the treatment that patients receive and the solutions they get is because of age. Doctors and specialists will work with teens to assist them in help with coping or improvement. But, in adults they allow them to choose if death is an alternative. Is this a good move to make moving forward or should I continue comparing terminally ill children with the mentally ill? Thank you.

    • davidbdale says:

      If I understand you correctly, Nina, you want to write about elderly terminally ill patients only, not children, and that the differences you’ll be noting are between the end-of-life choices older adults are offered that would never be offered to youth. I like that narrow focus.

  3. nina525 says:

    Instead of comparing terminally ill children and mentally ill patients, I think it would be less complex if I were to compare the treatment of patients who want to have the procedure and suffer from depression to the age of the individuals who want the procedure? If this is still confusing I updated my hypothesis.

    • davidbdale says:

      It is still confusing, Nina, but the confusion stems from imprecise phrasing. Nothing is harder or more important than being clear.

      I will compare the treatment of patients who want to have the procedure and suffer from depression to the age of the individuals who want the procedure.

      Here you propose to compare
      1. treatment of patients
      2. the age of individuals

      That can’t be right.

      What I think you mean to compare are:
      1. the readiness of medical professionals to permit euthanasia in elderly patients who suffer mental illness
      2. the reluctance of medical professionals to permit euthanasia in young patients who suffer mental illness

      Spelling out very clearly the terms of your comparison will be worth the effort.

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