Draft Causal Argument—Username

9/11 Made America More Racist

It seems that racism has been around since before the dawn of time itself. It has thrived in the best and worst of times and in every corner of the earth, doing particularly well in the United States of America. America’s relationship with racism has been a very long one and it’s still going strong. As if the situation hadn’t been dire enough, then the twin towers in New York City were attacked in an act of terrorism more horrific and devastating than the world had ever known. Whether or not the 9/11 hijackers understood the consequences of their actions is irrelevant. The after-effects rippled outwards and caused further damage more than what anyone could have expected. Fifteen years later, Americans are still dealing with the repercussions of one man’s decision to attack the United States. 9/11 shocked and terrified the world. That day set a new precedent for the future of public safety all over the globe. The TSA was exploding with new rules and restrictions on who and what can be on a plane. Americans become even more wary of anyone who didn’t look like them. The media turned the situation into a joke. Tabloids were printing new conspiracy theories everyday while shows like “South Park” and “Family Guy” turned the whole ordeal and those behind the attacks into a punchline. The saddest part is that we had an opportunity to make a comeback. It would have been one of the most difficult things our country had ever done and would have further changed the world forever but we failed to take advantage of our opportunity to find good in the situation. We’ve let the 9/11 attacks define our foreign policies, world relations and even how America functions domestically. Furthermore it’s changed how we relate to others. Our culture had never been particularly welcoming to new elements but more now than ever, we bristle at the idea of welcoming anyone or anything we’re not immediately familiar with. In recent years this reaction has softened, especially with younger generations rising up and becoming more politically aware but the majority of America still holds deeply rooted emotions against anything related to the 9/11 hijackings. The ripple effects of the attacks still continue outward even today. Presidential nominee Donald J. Trump made it a main point in his campaign to assure Americans that he’d place restrictions on allowing muslims to enter our country. Regardless of whether or not his prejudice stems from the attacks, many his voters share this sentiment because of the events of 9/11.

Citations
Rose, S. (2013, September 12). Since 9/11, Racism and Islamophobia Remain Intertwined. Retrieved November 04, 2016, from http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/steve-rose/911-racism-islamophobia_b_3908411.html

Poladian, C. (2015, September 11). The United States After 9/11: 6 Things That Have Changed Since 2001. Retrieved November 09, 2016, from http://www.ibtimes.com/pulse/united-states-after-911-6-things-have-changed-2001-2093156

About davidbdale

Inventor of and sole practitioner of 299-word Very Short Novels. www.davidbdale.wordpress.com
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7 Responses to Draft Causal Argument—Username

  1. davidbdale says:

    It seems that racism has been around since before the dawn of time itself.

    Probably not, since races weren’t around at the dawn of time. If you feel the need to be dramatic, choose a claim that has some validity, Username.

    It has thrived in the best and worst of times and in every corner of the earth, doing particularly well in the United States of America.

    Your claim has the unintended consequence of trivializing your thesis, Username. Something that has been with us forever and will always exist lacks urgency.

    America’s relationship with racism has been a very long one and it’s still going strong.

    You’re circling a thesis here somewhere, Prof. 1) Racism is as old as time. 2) It’s common in the US. 3) Repeat: It’s common in the US. Is any of this necessary?

    As if the situation hadn’t been dire enough, then the twin towers in New York City were attacked in an act of terrorism more horrific and devastating than the world had ever known.

    It might have felt that way to New Yorkers on that day, but you were barely alive, Username, and you didn’t survive the Russian pogroms of the early 20th century that killed millions. Just saying.

    Whether or not the 9/11 hijackers understood the consequences of their actions is irrelevant.

    It is, however, relevant that WE understand the consequences of their actions. So far you’re hinting that somehow they affected American racism. By now, if I weren’t your professor with your best interest at heart, I would have bailed on this essay. Make it go somewhere.

    The after-effects rippled outwards and caused further damage more than what anyone could have expected.

    Still teasing.

    Fifteen years later, Americans are still dealing with the repercussions of one man’s decision to attack the United States. 9/11 shocked and terrified the world.

    It did. And we are. But you promised me something I didn’t know.

    That day set a new precedent for the future of public safety all over the globe.

    You spent many sentences insisting that America is racist, then several more reminding us we were attacked 15 years ago by foreign terrorists. Now you’ve added a third wild card: public safety.

    The TSA was exploding with new rules and restrictions on who and what can be on a plane.

    What’s your timeline here, Prof? “Was exploding” before 9/11? Or was the agency empowered as a consequence of 9/11?

    Americans become even more wary of anyone who didn’t look like them.

    Let’s be clear here. The first several sentences give no indication what races you’re indicting, but the clear implication is that you’re discussing black/white racism. “Anyone who doesn’t look like an American” is an entirely different sort of prejudice. You haven’t been clear yet; this new prejudice against “foreigners,” if that’s what you’re getting at, makes your claims less clear.

    The media turned the situation into a joke.

    Hopelessly vague.

    Tabloids were printing new conspiracy theories everyday

    How is that treating the abomination as a joke?

    while shows like “South Park” and “Family Guy” turned the whole ordeal and those behind the attacks into a punchline.

    If so, an example would be extremely helpful. But even if so, you’ve shifted your position radically from “the media” to “tabloids and South Park.”

    The saddest part is that we had an opportunity to make a comeback.

    From what to what, Username? From a racist country to a color-blind country because of a terrorist attack? From an isolationist country to one that embraced people of all nations? Is your topic racism or nationalism?

    It would have been one of the most difficult things our country had ever done and would have further changed the world forever but we failed to take advantage of our opportunity to find good in the situation.

    I admire the effort you’re making to suggest that 9/11 could have been a “learning experience” of some kind, but you’re leaving the entire argument to our imaginations.

    We’ve let the 9/11 attacks define our foreign policies, world relations and even how America functions domestically.

    If this were still your introduction, you might be forgiven for painting with broad strokes with the promise of providing details later, but these THREE MASSIVE CLAIMS are entirely unsupported. How does the legacy of 9/11 drive our foreign policy? our international relations? our domestic programs?

    Furthermore it’s changed how we relate to others.

    Other Americans? Other races?

    Our culture had never been particularly welcoming to new elements but more now than ever, we bristle at the idea of welcoming anyone or anything we’re not immediately familiar with.

    We’re actually the primary destination for Immigrants from almost every country that people emigrate from.

    In recent years this reaction has softened, especially with younger generations rising up and becoming more politically aware but the majority of America still holds deeply rooted emotions against anything related to the 9/11 hijackings.

    Which reaction has softened? The resistance to immigration or foreign visitors that existed before they were born? or the worsening of that condition that you claim resulted from 9/11?

    The ripple effects of the attacks still continue outward even today.

    Are you going to redeem the promises you made in your first sentences that America is racist?

    Presidential nominee Donald J. Trump made it a main point in his campaign to assure Americans that he’d place restrictions on allowing Muslims to enter our country.

    Not racist. Discrimination based on religious belief.

    Regardless of whether or not his prejudice stems from the attacks, many his voters share this sentiment because of the events of 9/11.

    Don’t you want to distinguish between peace-loving observant Muslims and terrorists (religious or not) who blow things up and kill people in the name of jihad?

  2. g903254 says:

    “The saddest part is that we had an opportunity to make a comeback.”
    How? This point is brought up, but never explained. Explaining this would make this paper stronger as the reader would be able see the road the U.S went down and the road the U.S could have taken which would allow the reader to see the contrast between the two.

  3. chavanillo says:

    The thing is that the person who did this paper warn really in details and was back and forth with his or her argument. very point the writer gave there isn’t no explanation, so making it hard to even have a thesis. The writer is talking the tragic of 9/11, but doesn’t;t go into detail on what is her point.

  4. pomegranate4800 says:

    “It would have been one of the most difficult things our country had ever done and would have further changed the world forever but we failed to take advantage of our opportunity to find good in the situation”
    In what way could we have “came back.” Also, what exactly are we coming back from. What should be thoroughly explained is what the U.S. did or could have done to come back from whoever or what ever came at them.

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