Claims-nousernamefound1

“Like Brannan’s symptoms”

The author uses an analogy claim. In this situation, Brannan’s symptoms are being compared to hypervigilance. 

“Hypervigilance sounds innocuous, but it is in fact exhaustingly distressing, a conditioned response to life-threatening situations”

A categorical claim is used in this situation because of the fact that it’s listing all of the symptoms of Hypervigilance.

“Imagine your nervous system spiking, readying you as you feel your way along the walls, the sensitivity of your hearing, the tautness in your muscles, the alertness shooting around inside your skull”

Analogy and categorical claim were used in this situation. The feeling of being nervous, sensitivity of hearing, and the tautness in your muscles are being states as symptoms of PTSD. In fact, the author compares the symptoms of being scared and the symptoms of PTSD.  

“And then imagine feeling like that all the time”

The author wants you to actually picture yourself feeling these symptoms all the time when trying to figure out the effects of PTSD on a person. I would say this is a recommendation or proposal claim only because the author wants you to actually picture the feeling. This would be a casual claim also because it claims that the people that have PTSD experience the same way all the time.

“Caleb has been home since 2006, way more than enough time for Brannan to catch his symptoms”

This is a casual claim because the author believes that being around someone for a long time can cause them to catch the symptoms.

 

 

 

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1 Response to Claims-nousernamefound1

  1. davidbdale says:

    “Like Brannan’s symptoms”

    The author uses an analogy claim. In this situation, Brannan’s symptoms are being compared to hypervigilance.

    DSH: Maybe. An analogy is a comparison between things that are not thought of as similar, where the comparison requires readers to re-imagine the terms being compared. When PTSD is described as “contagious,” the analogy requires that we think of a psychological disorder as similar to the flu, something that can be “caught” from someone else. That’s a new way to consider psychology. In the quote you’ve chosen, the word “like” is used in a more common way, the way you might say, “I’m crazy about some foods, like coffee ice cream.” In that sentence, and in yours, the author is merely suggesting an example of one item that belongs in a category. In other words, making a categorical claim. In its entirety, the claim Mac McClelland makes is: “even less understood is the collateral damage, to families, to schools, to society—emotional and fiscal costs borne long after the war is over. Like Brannan’s symptoms.” Collateral damage like Brannan’s symptoms. Foods I love like coffee ice cream.

    “Hypervigilance sounds innocuous, but it is in fact exhaustingly distressing, a conditioned response to life-threatening situations”

    A categorical claim is used in this situation because of the fact that it’s listing all of the symptoms of Hypervigilance.

    DSH: Agreed, mostly. But more accurately a definition claim. There’s a good bit of overlap between the two. Both investigate attributes of an item. DEFINITION: coffee ice cream, the frozen confection of milk, cream and sugar, flavored with coffee beans or condensed brewed coffee, is served in cups or cones. CATEGORICAL: Artisan dessert makers are using exotic flavors for their products—rosemary, cumin, smoked paprika ice creams, for example, to supplant more familiar flavoring agents like coffee. In this case, coffee ice cream DOES NOT belong to the category: new exotic ice cream flavors—a categorical claim.

    “Imagine your nervous system spiking, readying you as you feel your way along the walls, the sensitivity of your hearing, the tautness in your muscles, the alertness shooting around inside your skull”

    Analogy and categorical claim were used in this situation. The feeling of being nervous, sensitivity of hearing, and the tautness in your muscles are being states as symptoms of PTSD. In fact, the author compares the symptoms of being scared and the symptoms of PTSD.

    DSH: I like it!

    “And then imagine feeling like that all the time”

    The author wants you to actually picture yourself feeling these symptoms all the time when trying to figure out the effects of PTSD on a person. I would say this is a recommendation or proposal claim only because the author wants you to actually picture the feeling. This would be a casual claim also because it claims that the people that have PTSD experience the same way all the time.

    DSH: Definitely a proposal claim! If you mean the author is claiming PTSD is the CAUSE of these symptoms, then yes, it’s also a CAUSAL (not CAS-U-AL) claim.

    “Caleb has been home since 2006, way more than enough time for Brannan to catch his symptoms”

    This is a casual (CAUSAL) claim because the author believes that being around someone for a long time can cause them to catch the symptoms.

    DSH: Absolutely!

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