Definition Essay : Eddie Jahn

The Game of Numbers

The term sabermetrics will not mean anything to people who do not know about baseball, but to those who do know about baseball this term changed the game. Sabermetrics is the statistical analysis of baseball. There are statistics that players will get paid millions for such as home runs, earned run average, and batting average. Some statistics are over looked, and will win a team a game such as one statistic which is RE24 or  base- out runs saved. This statistic is described as “Given the bases occupied/out situation, how many runs did the pitcher save in the resulting play”(Baseball-Reference.com 1). (An example of this statistic would be if a pitcher was to come in with men on second and third base with one out and get both of the next batters out his statistic would be above zero, and if he would have gave up a run his average would be negative.

The statistic base-out runs saved will win games for your team. It can be considered a “winning statistic” because if your team has a better base-out runs saved percentage than the team you are playing against you will win the game. Every game has this statistic, and it is for only pitchers. The batters have the opportunity to ruin the other team’s statistic, but that is where the competition happens, it is the pitchers against the batters. This  “winning statistic” shows up in every game, but I will give you examples from two  specific World Series which are the 2002 World Series between the Anaheim Angels and San Francisco Giants and the 2003 World Series between the Florida Marlins and New York Yankees. These two World Series demonstrate the teams’ base-out runs saved average in each game and whoever had the better average won the game no matter if the team had a team of all-stars and the other team had role players such as the New York Yankees vs. Florida Marlins.

The 2002 World Series between the Anaheim Angels and San Francisco Giants had two good teams with players that had roles and players that were all stars also such as Barry Bonds of the Giants who would go on to break the Major League Baseball homerun record later in his career.  For game one  pitchers for the Giants had an RE24 of 1.9 while the Angels had an RE24 of 0.9 the Giants went on to win this game 4-3. The pitchers that messed up the team average for the Angels were Jarrod Washburn who had an RE24 of -0.9, and Scott Shoeneweiss who had an RE24 of -0.3, Shoeneweiss had come in the eighth inning faced one batter and walked him then got taken out. Game two had the Giants losing to the Angels 10-11, the Giants had an RE24 of  -6.7 while the Angels had an RE24 of -5.1. Game three had the Angels beating the Giants by a score of 10-4, the Angels had an RE24 of 0.2 while the Giants had an RE24 of  -5.8. Starting pitcher for the Giants Livan Hernandez contributed with an RE24 of -3.5. Game four had the Giants defeating the Angels 4-3, the Giants had an RE24 of 1.2, while the Angels had an RE24 of -0.2 with starting pitcher John Lackey contributing an average of -0.6. A big part of that average happened in the bottom of the fifth inning where Lackey gave up three runs, four hits, and faced eight batters that inning. Game five had the Giants defeating the Angels by a score of 16-4. The Giants had an RE24 of 0.2 while the Angels had an RE24 of -12.2. Three pitchers for the Angels had very bad averages they were Jarrod Washburn who had an RE24 of -4.1, Ben Weber who had an RE24 of -4.0, and Scott Shields who had an RE24 of -4.6. Jarrod Washburn gave up six runs on five hits in the first two innings, in the bottom of the seventh inning Ben Weber gave up four runs on four hits, and Scott Shields gave up four runs on three hits in the bottom of the eighth inning. In Game six had the Giants losing to the Angels by a score of 3-4 the Giants had an RE24 of -1.7 while the Angels had an RE24 of -0.1. The series came down to game seven where the Giants lost to the Angels by a score of 1-4, the Giants had an RE24 of  0.4 while the Angels had an RE24 of 3.9. (“2002 World Series Anaheim Angels vs. San Francisco Giants” 1).

RE24 was an important statistic in the 2002 World Series, and it was as well in the 2003 World Series between the Florida Marlins and New York Yankees. In game one the Marlins defeated the Yankees 3-2 , the Marlins had an RE24 of 2.8 while the Yankees had an RE24 of 1.8, the Yankees pitchers did not have anyone over a 1.0 average while the Marlins had two pitchers with averages of 1.1 who were Dontrelle Willis, and the Marlins closer Uguetha Urbina. In game two the Florida Marlins lost to the Yankees by a score of 1-6, the Marlins had an RE24 of -1.7 while the Yankees had an RE24 of 3.8. The Marlins starter Mark Redman had an RE24 of -3.3, he had problems in the bottom of the first giving up three runs on two hits, while the Yankees starter Andy Pettitte had an RE24 of 3.3. In game three the Marlins lost to the Yankees by a score of 1-6. The Marlins had an RE24 of -1.4 while the Yankees had an RE24 of 3.6. The Marlin’s starter Josh Beckett had an RE24 of 2.4, but the closer Braden Looper had an RE24 of -2.5 which happened in the top of the ninth inning where he gave up four runs on two hits. The Yankees starting pitcher Mike Mussina had an RE24 of 2.6. In game four the Marlins defeated the Yankees by a score of 4-3. The Marlins had an Re24 of 3.1 while the Yankees had a RE24 of 1.6. Contributing to the Marlins average were starting pitcher Carl Pavano with an RE24 of 3.1 and closer Braden Looper who had an RE24 of 2.1. In game five the Marlins defeated the Yankees by a score of 6-4. The Marlins had an RE24 of 0.6 while the Yankees had an RE24 of -1.9. In game six the Marlins won the World Series with a score of 2-0 . The Marlins had Josh Beckett pitch a complete game shutout and his RE24 was 4.8, the Yankees had an RE24 of 2.8. (“2003 World Series Florida Marlins vs. New York Yankees” 1). 

Both of these World Series show how the statistic base-out runs saved really is the “winning statistic”,  because every team that had the higher average won the game. The statistic is important to the teams because it is the difference between giving up runs when a pitcher is in a tough situation or if he is going to get out of the inning without giving up any runs. That gives your team the ability to put something together and scrounge up a run or two and if you can do that and not give up any runs you will win the game.

Works Cited

Baseball-Reference.com. Web. 01 Mar. 2012.

“2002 World Series Anaheim Angels vs. San Francisco Giants.” Baseball-Reference.com. Web. 01 Mar. 2012.

“2003 World Series Florida Marlins vs. New York Yankees.” Baseball-Reference.com. Web. 01 Mar. 2012.

 

These websites are the main websites that I use, but I go into different links like the box scores for every game, but I am not sure if I have to cite every single page I use if I do can someone let me know, so that I can do that.

This entry was posted in x Definition Essay. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Definition Essay : Eddie Jahn

  1. jahne92 says:

    Can you comment on my definition essay I am not sure if this really fits the persuasive topic now, and also I was wondering if it was alright, and also I was wondering if I should add in a opposing topic also.

  2. davidbdale says:

    Eddie, I’m impressed. I challenged you to come up with a sabermetric that actually proved itself as a statistic that could be counted on to provide a reason to sign particular players and you have provided a little-known average that sounds as if it would help me sign more effective pitchers.

    But does it? Pitchers are most often signed and paid on the basis of their ERAs and their Won/Loss records. While ERA is a good indication of how many runs a pitcher gives up that aren’t his teammates’ fault, a pitcher with plenty of run support can handle a high ERA and still rack up plenty of wins, while a pitcher whose team doesn’t hit can boast a sparkling ERA and not win any games. So clearly those two numbers have to be supplemented with something else.

    Why is the RE24 better in determining whether I want to sign Dontrelle Willis or Schott Shoeneweiss? As you describe it, the RE24 measures how many runs a pitcher saves in play. Your example has men on second and third. It also assumes a reliever. Is that how it’s always used, or does it measure the starter’s effectiveness if he never lets a man on base? In other words, what’s the RE24 for a no-hitter? Your partial description: “given the bases occupied/out situation” doesn’t tell me much.

    You also call the statistic: “base-out runs saved,” and claim that if your “ba-rs” is better than your opponent’s you’ll win every time. Which is great, except that the same could be said of your “comparative runs scored” statistic. If my “crs” is higher than yours, I win every time by scoring more runs than you do.

    In other words, how is the RE24 different from earned-run average or my runs-scored-against average? Instead of a detailed list of the comparative RE24s for the several games you track, which you could easily summarize, what we really need is a clearer understanding of what this statistic measures.

    Don’t get me wrong; I love where you’re going here, Eddie, ESPECIALLY if it gives teams that track this particular number an advantage in hiring pitchers everybody else undervalues, which is the whole point of sabermetrics.

    By the way, in the games you track here, did you make clear whether the underdog won by posting a better RE24 than the favored team? That would help your argument.

    Is this helpful? Do you have additional questions?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s